Narsai David Recipe: Marmalade

(KCBS) – ‘Tis the season for citrus! There are so many varieties of citrus fruits in the market right now. KCBS Food and Wine Editor Narsai David shares an easy recipe for marmalade.

Narsai’s Marmalade
(Orange, Grapefruit, Lemon, Lime)

Wash whole fruit under running water.
Cut away stem and any trademarks on the skin.
Cut fruit in half and squeeze out the juice.
Reserve juice.
Cut the hollowed out shells in half again.
Put the rinds in a pot, cover with a lot of water, bring to a boil and simmer until tender.
Pull out and discard all the tough interior membranes. If you are blending different fruits, keep the rinds separate at this point, as the cooking time varies. (Orange rinds may be tender in 20 minutes. Grapefruit may take 25 minutes. Firm lemons and limes take up to 30 minutes.) Drain in a colander and discard the liquid.
You may now slice the rind thinly, or grind through the chili plate of a meat grinder or chop in a food processor as you desire.
Combine the rind and the juice in a measuring cup.
Add the same volume of sugar as the combined volume of fruit juice and rind.
Cook over moderate heat, stirring frequently until it almost jells, generally about 10 to 15 minutes. There is so much pectin in citrus, that it tends to stiffen up a bit in the jar until it cools.

NOTE: A blend of different citrus fruits such as orange and lemon make a very nice marmalade. A most appealing marmalade is made with pink grapefruit, which gives a golden, pink color and a delicious taste to it. Meyer lemons make an exceptional marmalade with their elegant floral aroma. Finally, blood oranges create the most unusual rich color for a marmalade.

Narsai David is the KCBS Food and Wine Editor. He has been a successful restaurateur, chef, TV host, and columnist in the Bay Area spanning four decades.

(© 2010 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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  • Sam

    Please send me a recipe for pickling turnips. I can never find one.
    Thank you

  • Kate Leiva

    I used this recipe for (orange) marmalade for years after seeing it in the Chronicle perhaps 15 years ago. I’d always thought English-style marmalade unpleasantly bitter, but this one is perfect, using the entire fruit to advantage. Cook it to the point that pleases you; for a more easily spreadable consistency I always removed it this side of the jelling point. A friend asked me for a marmalade recipe today and I’m delighted I was able to find it online, though I still have the original recipe from the newspaper.

  • rose

    As the owner of an extremely fruitful Meyer lemon tree and an avid jam maker, I’ve tried several marmalade recipes. I always come back to this one, having first used it sometime in the early 00’s. I slice the rind thinly into little strips, and the resulting marmalade is as beautiful as it is delicious and tangy.

    There is nothing like homemade Meyer lemon marmalade on toasted sourdough bread. YUM! Think I’ll go have another….

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