Caltrain Declares Fiscal Emergency; Fare Hikes, Service Cuts Viewed

SAN JOSE (KCBS/BCN) – Caltrain’s board of directors voted Thursday morning to declare a fiscal emergency to allow the agency more leeway in addressing its $30 million budget deficit.

The Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board has declared a fiscal emergency for the struggling transit agency for the past several years.

The declaration makes it easier for Caltrain to raise fares and reduce service, two options on the table as it tries to stay afloat.

KCBS’ Anna Duckworth Reports:

Caltrain riders flooded the board meeting in San Carlos Thursday morning to plead against station closures in their cities.

The board was considering terminating service at a number of Caltrain stations including South San Francisco, Belmont, San Bruno, and the College Park station in San Jose.

“South San Francisco is one of the select cities along the Peninsula Caltrain corridor where jobs are being created,” South San Francisco Mayor Kevin Mullin said at the meeting.

Several students from Bellarmine College Preparatory in San Jose said they depend on service at the College Park station.

“This is not simply a matter of convenience for the Bellarmine community,” said Brian Adams, vice president for advancement at Bellarmine.

He said about 45 percent of the school’s 2,000 Caltrain riders use services that are on the chopping block.

KCBS’ Matt Bigler Reports:

Caltrain already cut weekday service once this year.

There would be no weekend service under the cuts, which would take effect on July 2 if approved.

The Valley Transportation Authority has offered to make a one-time, $7.1 million payment to Caltrain as rail officials try to identify a dedicated source of funding to smooth over its budget problems.

Caltrain Information On Public Hearings

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  • Marc

    What about merging the Altamont Corridor Express, Capital Corridor, and Caltrain?

    That would make for more buying power, less admin overhead, offer a rational for having more technical staff training, and it would set things up nicely for dovetailing the merged systems into High Speed Rail coming from the south.

  • Jaded

    Capital Cooridor is one of the few (or only) profitable train line outside of the Northeast. Why would they want to take on more risk?

  • Mad Mike

    30 million in the red but by all means let us waste BILLIONS more on High Speed Rail just so we can be more like Europe. Makes sense to me…..

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