60 Minutes Interview Transcript Of Confessed Chauncey Bailey Killer

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Former Your Black Muslim Bakery handyman Devaughndre Broussard (CBS)

Former Your Black Muslim Bakery handyman Devaughndre Broussard (CBS)

OAKLAND (CBS) – In February 2008, “60 Minutes” reported on the murder of Oakland journalist Chauncey Bailey, whose death has been linked to an investigation he was conducting into a controversial local business called “Your Black Muslim Bakery.”

On Monday, two men charged with Bailey’s murder went on trial for his killing. One of the key witnesses in the case is likely to be Devaughndre Broussard, a young man who had been a janitor and handyman at the Bakery.

Immediately after the killing, Broussard confessed to the murder and then recanted that admission. Months later, in his interview with 60 Minutes correspondent Anderson Cooper, Broussard said he didn’t kill Chauncey Bailey and that he’d been coerced into a false confession by the head of the bakery, Yusuf Bey IV.

That was the way things stood in 2008. A year later, Broussard changed his story again and confessed to killing Bailey on Bey’s orders. Broussard pled guilty to voluntary manslaughter and is now a likely prosecution witness in the upcoming murder case against Bey.

Below is Anderson Cooper’s full interview with Broussard in the Alameda County jail where Broussard was being held in 2008.

ANDERSON COOPER: How did you first get to the Bakery? How did you first come to live there?

DEVAUGHNDRE BROUSSARD: I found out about the bakery in like July ‘06. It was—it was the last day before I got released from San Francisco County Jail. I ran into one of my family members. And he told me if he—if he could give me a job would I accept it? And I said, “Yeah.” And he told me about the job, told me where it was at. At first, I was—I was reluctant, because I was thinking like, “I’m not about to go work with no Muslims.” But then I realized this is a chance for me to stay out of jail, so I went to go work there formally.

COOPER: What was it like at the Bakery?

BROUSSARD: It was a good place. Because I felt like, you know, like they’re really here for the—for the black people and what not. You know, they were speaking about how—how we gotta change as a people. They were—they were speaking about how, how we got to come together as one, you know, speaking on—speaking on the problems as a—as a people and how we can solve ‘em.

COOPER: What was your job at the Bakery?

BROUSSARD: I was basically cleaning. Cleaning up, sweeping, mopping, washing dishes, scrubbing pans. The dirty work, basically.

COOPER: Did you always live there? Or did you—

BROUSSARD: I didn’t always live there. At first when I first went there, there was—they had—they had a residence for people that was—that didn’t have nowhere to live and what not. And then I had somewhere to stay, but they was like, “It would be better if everybody who worked there would stay on—would stay on the premises.”

COOPER: How many people lived there?

BROUSSARD: It varied. It varied from time to time.

COOPER: But, I mean, from a handful to a couple dozen? I’ve never been there, so—

BROUSSARD: Like a handful. Like right around, like ten or fifteen people.

COOPER: Did you have a roommate there?

BROUSSARD: Nah, you had your own room.

COOPER: What was your average day there like? What was your schedule?

BROUSSARD: You wake up, get ready for work. Then you go to work. You stay at work. You clean up. And then at night it’d be—it’d be—it’d be brotherhood meetings. That’s—that’s about it.

COOPER: Were you Muslim? Or are you Muslim?

BROUSSARD: At first, when I went there I wasn’t—I wasn’t—I wasn’t—I wasn’t a Muslim or I wasn’t practicing Islam or what not. I was just taking it as—as it was a job. But then I realized like my—I gotta—gotta open up. Then I—I start—I started feeling what they was talking about. Like it was—it was good stuff, what they was talking about. And then, so I started—I started practicing. I started practicing Islam.

COOPER: Do you consider yourself Muslim now?

BROUSSARD: Yes, I do.

COOPER: So on August 3rd you told police that—that you killed Chauncey Bailey. You then later on, a couple days later, said that you didn’t. Why did you say that you killed him?

BROUSSARD: I didn’t kill Chauncey Bailey. I gave—I gave the false answers to the—to the Oakland Police because I was overcome by emotion.

COOPER: What do you mean?

BROUSSARD: Because of what Yusuf Bey IV was telling me. He told me that—he was telling me how—how I was being tested by God. He was telling me I didn’t realize I was being tested by God. He was telling me that—

COOPER: He said that God was testing you?

BROUSSARD: Yes, he did.

COOPER: How?

BROUSSARD: He was saying that—that—that at one point people gotta prove that—you gotta—you gotta prove your loyalty and what not.

COOPER: Loyalty to whom or to what?

BROUSSARD: You gotta prove your loyalty to the Bakery. And you gotta prove your loyalty to God. And then, so he was telling me that if I say I admit to this and I say that I did this, that they would release everybody. He was telling me that they was holding everybody that they arrested as suspects in the murder of Mr. Chauncey Bailey.

COOPER: So he told you that there were other people being held from the Bakery in Chauncey Bailey’s murder?

BROUSSARD: Yes, he did.

COOPER: And that by testifying, by saying that you killed him, everyone else would go free?

BROUSSARD: He was saying that if I say I did this, that they would release everybody. Because that’s—that’s what they was holding them for. He was telling me that—he was telling me how well he knew the police officers or what not.

COOPER: How he knew what?

BROUSSARD: How well he knew the police officers. Because he said that they was like his, I guess, his friends and what not. He was telling me that—

COOPER: He said the police were his friends?

BROUSSARD: Yeah, one of the detectives, I guess, he knew—I guess he knew him kind of well or what not. Because they was—you know, they was—they was saying—there was—there was talking—they was talking like—like they knew each other. He was—he was—then he’s telling me that if I say I did this, I would get no more than a county year.

COOPER: He said you would just get a year.

BROUSSARD: He said I would get no more than a county year. He said that—he was saying that if I said I did this, that he would get me a lawyer when he get out. And then the lawyer would get it dropped down to manslaughter. And I’d get no more than a county year.

COOPER: What did you think of Bey IV? I mean, what was your relationship with him?

BROUSSARD: At first, like I said, when I—when I first went there, I just thought of it as a job. And then as time—as time went on and, and I came to accept—I came—I came to believe what—what—what the Muslims was talking about was good. And then so, you know, I was like—I was like—I looked up to him. Because I’m like this is—this is the leader of the Black Muslim Bakery. And so you gotta—you gotta follow the leader.

COOPER: So when you get arrested, how did you come to be in a room with Yusuf Bey IV?

BROUSSARD: What you mean?

COOPER: I mean you’re in police custody. How did you end up in a room with him?

BROUSSARD: The police put us in a room together.

COOPER: Why?

BROUSSARD: I don’t know. Ask the police that.

COOPER: Did you ask to be in a room with Yusuf Bey IV?

BROUSSARD: No, I didn’t.

COOPER: Because there had been some reports saying that you had requested it.

BROUSSARD: I didn’t ask to be in a room with him.

COOPER: So they just bring you in a room with Yusuf Bey IV?

BROUSSARD: They just brung me in a room with him.

COOPER: What was the first thing he said to you?

BROUSSARD: He was telling me how I gotta take this case. He was persuading me to take this case. He was telling me that—he was telling me like, you know, “You gotta do this for us. You gotta do this for the Bakery. You gotta do this for the brotherhood.” He was saying—he was saying like, you know, “Every—everybody—everybody got to prove theyself.” He was—he was saying, “I’m your commanding officer. You gotta follow orders. And you know—and you know you can’t—you know you can’t deny an order from your commanding officer.”

COOPER: Did you think he was your commanding officer?

BROUSSARD: It was a chain of command at the—at the Bakery. You know, like—you know, like—if somebody got more rank than you, you got to follow what they say. And he was—he was at the top of the chain of command.

COOPER: It sounds more like an army than it does a bakery.

BROUSSARD: It was like the black man army.

COOPER: It was like the black man army?

BROUSSARD: The black man’s army.

COOPER: So when he tells you that, you know, you gotta do this, you gotta—you gotta plead guilty. You gotta say you killed Chauncey Bailey, what’d you think?

BROUSSARD: I thought he was full of s***. I thought he—I thought he was trippin’. I’m like, “Why would you say—why would you want me to say something like that?”

COOPER: But you did end up saying that.

BROUSSARD: He was telling me how—what I gotta say. He was telling—he was telling me how—how I gotta make it sound good. He was saying—he was saying like—he was telling me that if I don’t make it believable, they won’t release nobody.

COOPER: How long were you sitting with him? How long did you talk to Yusuf Bey?

BROUSSARD: I didn’t have a watch. So I don’t know how long we was in the room together. But he was—I mean, it was mania. It was mania.

COOPER: It was what?

BROUSSARD: It was mania.

COOPER: What does that mean?

BROUSSARD: Like a lot of stuff was happening.

COOPER: Manic, okay.

BROUSSARD: A lot of stuff was happening.

COOPER: So you leave the room. And then right away did you tell police that you killed him?

BROUSSARD: When we was in the room he was telling me—he was telling me—he—he was—he was pressing the issue. He was pressing the issue. Because he was saying like, “You gotta take this case for us. You gotta.” He was telling me how I gotta take this case and why I should take the case. And then I would tell him like, “Nah, I ain’t going to take the case. Because if I take this case then I—I would never get out of jail.”

He was telling me how he said—he was telling me how I say—he like—he’s like, “You know, I got money. I got money. And so, you know, if I get out, I’m going to make sure you get a good lawyer. I’m going to pay for the lawyer. And you know that—and you know that as a brotherhood we stay together. We got unity. So we ain’t—we just not going to let one of ours fall.”

COOPER: Did you believe him?

BROUSSARD: Yeah, I did.

COOPER: You believed him?

BROUSSARD: I believed him. I mean, I—I seen the houses he had, the cars he had. I mean—I mean, I—I never had nothing like that. So I mean, you know, they say money can buy whatever. So I believed him.

COOPER: Did he say anything about Chauncey Bailey when you met with him?

BROUSSARD: He didn’t say nothing about Chauncey Bailey. He was just—he was just—he was just saying like—like—like, “You got to take this case for me. You got to take this case for us. You gotta take the case for the brotherhood.”

COOPER: He said a lot of things to you. What was it that really convinced you, “Okay, you know what? I’m going to say I killed Chauncey Bailey.”

BROUSSARD: Then he start pressing the issue. So he was—he was saying like I was being tested by God. And then, I mean, at that time like I said, I was practicing. I started—I started believing in Islam. And I’m like, you know, I really believed. So I’m—I’m gonna prove myself. I wanted to prove myself.

COOPER: Prove yourself to whom?

BROUSSARD: To God.

COOPER: So by proving yourself to God, by saying you killed Chauncey Bailey, that was proving yourself to God?

BROUSSARD: He was saying, “At this point in time you can prove yourself. You proving yourself to God. You being tested by God.” He was saying that, “Most times people don’t realize when they being tested by God. I’m helping you out. I’m telling you that you being tested by God.”

COOPER: You said to police when you confessed that you wanted to be “a real strong soldier.” What did you mean by that?

BROUSSARD: Like I says, it was a black man’s army. So—and so you—you a soldier. You start out—you start out—you start out as a soldier. And so when, like I said, when they—when they put us in a room together he was—he was—he was pressing the issues on, you feel me, on why I gotta do this, on why I should say I did this. He was telling me—he was telling, “Well, you got to say this. You gotta say it like this. You gotta tell ‘em like how this happened.”

COOPER: When you met with Yusuf Bey IV, did you realize that he had already told police that you had killed Chauncey Bailey?

BROUSSARD: I didn’t kill Chauncey Bailey.

COOPER: But did you know that Yusuf had said you did?

BROUSSARD: When they had me in the interview room without him, they kept coming in the room telling me how Yusuf Bey IV said I killed him. They was saying how Yusuf Bey IV said I shot him this many times. They’ll leave the room. They’ll come back and they’ll say how Yusuf Bey IV say I shot him this place and that place. Then I was denying it. I say, “I don’t know what you’re talking about.” Then later on they’ll come back and they’ll say, “Yusuf Bey IV said you was driving his van.” And then I—I started—I started saying, “I plead the fifth.” I started saying, “I plead the fifth.” I was like, “I don’t even want to talk.”

And then the detective, he was saying like, “No, you gonna talk.” He was like—he was like—he’s like, “You ain’t getting out of this. You can’t let Yusuf Bey IV take the fall for this.” And I was saying like—I’m like—I’m like, “Where my lawyer at?” They’re like, “You ain’t getting no lawyer.” They’re like, “You ain’t getting no lawyer.” I was like, I—I—I lay my head down. I’m like, “I plead the Fifth.” And then he yanked me up. He like—he like—he like, “So say you did it.” I’m like, “I didn’t do nothing.”

I kept trying to lay down. I started trying to ignore ‘em. They left the room. They came back. They were saying, Yusuf Bey IV—they’re like—Yusuf—they’re like, “Yusuf Bey IV gave you up. So why don’t you give him up?” I’m like, “I don’t know nothing about that. So I’m not—I’m like, I don’t know nothing about that. So I’m not going to say—I’m not going to say nothing.”

COOPER: Did you know that—that Yusuf Bey IV given you up?

BROUSSARD: He didn’t give me up. He just told the police that I supposedly did something. That’s what he did. I didn’t do nothing.

COOPER: When you met with him, when you were in the room with him—

BROUSSARD: When I was in the room with him, when they brung me in the room, I looked at him. And he was, you know, he was laid back. And then I was like, “Let me talk to him alone.” Because I want—I wanted to see why he would even say something like that. Because I told him the night before that I wouldn’t agree with this. And then I asked him, I said, “Why’d you even—why would you even say that I supposedly killed this man?” And then he was telling me—he was telling me, like, I got to take this case. He was saying like, “You gotta do this for us.”

COOPER: So did he deny that he had—

BROUSSARD: He didn’t deny.

COOPER: — ratted you out?

BROUSSARD: He didn’t. He didn’t deny it. He said that—he said I gotta—he—he was saying, “You are gonna take this case. You are gonna take this case.” He was—he was saying like, “You gonna take this case because they—they gonna believe me before they believe you.”

COOPER: What do you think now, I mean, knowing that Yusuf Bey IV said all this stuff about you to the police saying that, you know, you killed Chauncey Bailey?

BROUSSARD: How do I feel about that?

COOPER: Yeah.

BROUSSARD: I mean, he succeeded in what he wanted to do. So I can’t—I can’t—I can’t—I can’t—I can’t sit on that, because it ain’t go—it ain’t go—it ain’t going to change nothing. So I just gotta—I gotta try my hardest.

COOPER: But, I mean, this is a guy you trusted.

BROUSSARD: Like they say, the people you love is the one that’s going to hurt you the fastest. So he, you feel me, stabbed me.

COOPER: He stabbed you?

BROUSSARD: He got me.

COOPER: Yusuf Bey IV got you?

BROUSSARD: Got manip. Call him a nip, he nipped. Ran a good manip game. I thought he was going—you feel me, he told me that—he told me if I said I did this, that everything would be good. Everything going to be—everything going to be all right.

COOPER: He nipped you? He manipulated you?

BROUSSARD: Basically. And then I believed him. I mean, at first I was thinking to myself like, if I said I did this, I know I’m not going to get out of jail. But the way—the way that him and the—the detective dude, they was getting along like they really knew each other. The detective, he was saying like, “We can’t—we can’t—we can’t let Yusuf Bey IV go down. You know, he do—you know, he run—he doing good in the community. He helping out black people.”

COOPER: The police said that to you?

BROUSSARD: Police officer said that to me.

COOPER: Do you know which one? Who?

BROUSSARD: The black guy.

COOPER: The black police officer there said it to you that Yusuf Bey IV was doing good in the community?

BROUSSARD: Like he would say something. And then he would say something. And I kept—I kept—I’m like, “Nah, nah.” I’m like, “Nah.” He was saying like—he like, “Nah, you going to do this.” The detective, he was like, “You going to do this. You going to say you did this.” And I was like, “Nah, nah, I don’t know what you talking about.” And then I was like, “Let me talk to him alone.” And then, so I asked him. I was like—like I told you earlier, I asked—I said, “Why you even say I did this? I told you I said I ain’t going to even—I told you I ain’t going to even rock with this.” And he was saying like, “You gotta. You gotta. You gotta. You gotta. You gotta help us out. You gotta take this fall.” He was saying like, “As your commanding officer, you gotta follow my orders.”

COOPER: When was the first time you ever heard about Chauncey Bailey?

BROUSSARD: I never heard about Chauncey Bailey. I never met him. I never seen him. The first time I heard about Mr. Chauncey Bailey was that night I got arrested.

COOPER: You never heard of him before?

BROUSSARD: Never heard of him before.

COOPER: He’d been on TV though. He had a TV show. Apparently he was pretty well known at the Bakery.

BROUSSARD: I never heard of him. I never met him. Like I say, I heard about the Bakery a year—a year before that. So I never heard about the Black Muslim Bakery before I went there.

COOPER: Was anyone at the Bakery upset with Chauncey Bailey that you knew about?

BROUSSARD: Not—I don’t know.

COOPER: So where were you when Chauncey Bailey was killed?

BROUSSARD: I was at work.

COOPER: What were you doing?

BROUSSARD: Cleaning.

COOPER: Didn’t you tell police that you had been asleep initially?

BROUSSARD: I was working. I told—they—they asked me what time did I wake up? And I told ‘em. I said, “I don’t remember the time I woke up.” Because I was—the apartment that we was staying in was with two other people. And we were sharing an apartment, everybody that worked together.

And the person who—and the other person that was staying in the house with us, he was the supervisor of the Bakery. And so, like I say, once you wake up, you—you basically go to work. And so you—and so the Bakery opens up the doors at nine o’clock. And people be up earlier than that. And then so I basic—I basically was sleeping in. And I went—when I—when I get woke up – if I don’t wake up on my own, somebody wake me up, and they’ll tell me to get ready for—for work.

COOPER: So did anybody see you working at the Bakery at the time that Chauncey Bailey was killed?

BROUSSARD: The employees, the other—the other brothers and sisters that was working there.

COOPER: They saw you?

BROUSSARD: Yeah.

COOPER: Do you know—are any of them willing to come forward?

BROUSSARD: I don’t know. I would hope they will.

COOPER: You were seen throwing a shotgun out the window during the police raid.

BROUSSARD: No police officer saw me show—throw a shotgun out the window.

COOPER: Nobody did? A police officer has said that he did though.

BROUSSARD: Nobody saw me throw a shotgun out the window.

COOPER: Did you ever have the shotgun?

BROUSSARD: They had a shotgun.

COOPER: You said they had a shotgun or—

BROUSSARD: They had a shotgun.

COOPER: How did the shotgun come to be in your possession?

BROUSSARD: The day before like—like—like they came—they came and they came. Yusuf Bey IV was like—he was like, “Here.” He was like, “Here, you got to take this gun for night security.” And he gave me a bag with some stuff in it. And then I just put it in my—just put the gun on the floor and put the bag in my closet. That was it.

COOPER: So Yusuf Bey IV gave you the shotgun?

BROUSSARD: He told me—he was like—he was like—he was like, “Here, hold this.”

COOPER: What did he want you to do with the gun?

BROUSSARD: I don’t know. He just—he—he just like—he was like, “Here hold this.”

COOPER: And what was in the bag of stuff that he gave you?

BROUSSARD: I never checked it, because it was—it was—because the day—that same day, that Friday—no wasn’t—I think it was Friday, yeah. The day before—the day—the day before we got arrested, it was a rally. And so he came and gave me—he came and gave me the shotgun and the bag. And then he was like—he was like—he was like, “Come on, we gotta get ready for this rally.”

COOPER: So if you were working maintenance at the Bakery—

BROUSSARD: Why would they give me a gun?

COOPER: Yeah.

BROUSSARD: Like I said, it was a black man’s army, so it was more than a job. Like, you know, like you work. And then we had brotherhood meetings. And so, you know, at the brotherhood meetings they—they would stress the importance of, you know, you got—you gotta defend what’s yours. And so everybody had to play a part.

COOPER: So had you seen guns at the Bakery before?

BROUSSARD: I mean, that—that was the gun I saw.

COOPER: But before that had you seen other guns?

BROUSSARD: No.

COOPER: Did you think it was strange that all of a sudden Yusuf Bey IV gives you a shotgun?

BROUSSARD: I seen guns before. So I—it wasn’t—it wasn’t strange. I’m like, “Oh, I’m going to give this back to him as soon as I can.” That’s what I was thinking. I’m like, I’ll get it as soon as the day over, I’m going to give it right back to him. One thing led to another like I never really got—I real—I really never got around to doing it.

COOPER: So you’re denying that you threw the shotgun out the window?

BROUSSARD: Yes.

COOPER: Police are going to testify that they saw you throwing the gun away. You’re saying point blank you didn’t throw the gun away?

BROUSSARD: It’s a lot of falsehood and a lot—you know, like—a person said I supposedly killed somebody. It—it ain’t no truth in that. But people believe in that. So I mean, you never know. You never know what’s up. I mean—

COOPER: As you know, that’s why we’re asking you the questions. So we don’t want to hear from other people. We want to hear from you and let you have the opportunity to tell your side of it. So if you had possession of the—of the shotgun and then police found the shotgun not in your possession how did it—what happened to the shotgun?

BROUSSARD: I don’t know.

COOPER: So you don’t know how it got from your room to where police found it? Did anyone ever mention that Chauncey Bailey was working on stories about the Bakery?

BROUSSARD: Nobody never mentioned that he was writing a story or he was starting to write a story.

COOPER: I didn’t know the Bakery. So I’m trying to figure out if, like, people talked about stuff that was happening outside or—or how much people talked about, you know, Chauncey Bailey’s writing a story, and it’s a bad story or anything like that. You hadn’t heard any of that?

BROUSSARD: (shakes head)

COOPER: The white van. People said you were driving the white van that day. Were you?

BROUSSARD: No, I wasn’t.

COOPER: You never drove any white van?

BROUSSARD: I never drove no van. I even got my license. I never drove the van.

COOPER: So people who come forward saying they saw you driving the van, they’re wrong?

BROUSSARD: They’re wrong. Falsehood.

COOPER: That was another thing Yusuf Bey IV had told police, that you borrowed the van from a guy named Rico.

BROUSSARD: And in the police reports it also says Rico gave the keys to Yusuf Bey IV. And he saw him drive away in the van. So you can make that conclusion on your own.

COOPER: Police said they saw a shotgun being thrown out the window. You’re saying you didn’t throw that shotgun out the window?

BROUSSARD: We already went over that.

COOPER: Right. I got it wrong, though. I said the police said that they saw you.

BROUSSARD: You already went over that.

COOPER: When you confessed, police were asking you about when you fired the shotgun. It didn’t seem like you really knew how to repeatedly fire a shotgun.

BROUSSARD: No. I—I said that was the first time I seen it. The day—the day before, when he gave me the shotgun the day before in the afternoon, what was that? August 2nd. That was the first time I seen it. Then when they—when they asked—when they—when they asked me how to—how to operate it or what not, I was thinking they didn’t believe me. I was thinking I failed. I was thinking, like, I tried.

COOPER: Police say, though, that you, when you confessed, that you knew things about the shooting that only the shooter would know. You know, how many times Chauncey Bailey was shot, where he was shot.

BROUSSARD: I came upon the details of the murder of Mr. Chauncey Bailey the night before when I was working and cleaning, finishing my daily duties at the Bakery.

COOPER: How did you come upon the details of it?

BROUSSARD: While I was cleaning and finishing up, I overheard some people talking about how a newspaper man got killed that day. And, you know, at least—you know, seemed kind of happy, you know, like—and then—then—then when they had me in the interview room, as I—as I told you earlier, the police—the police kept coming in and saying how Yusuf Bey IV said I did this and I did that.

And then when—when they put me in the room with Yusuf Bey IV, he was telling me—he was telling me how I gotta make it good. I gotta make it believable. And then, at first, I was reluctant. I was, like, “Nah.” He was saying—he was saying, “You gotta say this. You gotta say this. You gotta say it like this. You gotta say it like that, ‘cause if they don’t believe it, nobody won’t get out. And you know—and you know I can’t help nobody if we’re all in jail.”

COOPER: So did he tell you how many times Chauncey Bailey had been shot? How did you learn how many times Chauncey Bailey had been shot?

BROUSSARD: We’lls in the room and he was saying—he was just telling me what I gotta say, saying, “Say this. Say this. Say it like that. Say this. Say that. Say this. Say that.”

COOPER: So, he was telling specifics about what to say?

BROUSSARD: Yes, he was.

COOPER: So when police say, “Well, he knew how many times Chauncey Bailey was shot. He knew where Chauncey Bailey was shot.” You say you learned all that from Yusuf Bey IV?

BROUSSARD: I learned what he told me to- I—I told the police what Yusuf Bey IV told me to tell them.

COOPER: And did Yusuf Bey IV tell you how many times Chauncey Bailey got shot?

BROUSSARD: Yes, he did.

COOPER: Did he tell you where Chauncey Bailey had been shot?

BROUSSARD: Yes, he did.

COOPER: The night before you said you heard people talking about Chauncey Bailey. How did you know who Chauncey Bailey was? Did you know who Chauncey Bailey was?

BROUSSARD: No. I heard—I heard people describing how a newspaperman got killed that day. That’s what I see.

COOPER: And what were they saying about him?

BROUSSARD: I’m gonna give—I’m gonna give those details up when I go to trial.

COOPER: You don’t wanna say now?

BROUSSARD: Wait ‘til I go to trial.

COOPER: Are you concerned about your own safety now?

BROUSSARD: You know, anything could happen to anybody at any time or anywhere, so I mean, it’s always good to watch your back.

COOPER: You say you did not kill Chauncey Bailey?

BROUSSARD: No. I did not.

COOPER: Do you know who did?

BROUSSARD: I’m gonna give those charges—I’m gonna give all that information up when I go to trial.

COOPER: So you’re saying you do know? You do have information about who killed Chauncey Bailey?

BROUSSARD: I give the information up when I go to trial.

COOPER: Why not now? Why not before?

BROUSSARD: Because this don’t decide my trial.

COOPER: But if there’s somebody else out there who did kill Chauncey Bailey, wouldn’t that help your case now?

BROUSSARD: Yes, it would. Yes, it would. But like I—like I told you—I just told you, you know, I’m gonna give—I’m gonna give the information up when I go to trial.

COOPER: What do you think now about Yusuf Bey IV, knowing all you know?

BROUSSARD: I feel let down. I feel let down.

COOPER: Let down how?

BROUSSARD: I don’t really like repeating myself. I just told you—I told you he didn’t—you feel me? Like I—I feel—I feel manipulated now, you feel me? Cause I first—I told him—I told him I wasn’t even go – told him I wasn’t even gonna go help out with this. And then he went and told the police anything. And then the police—the police, they kept—they kept—they kept talking—they kept saying anything to me. And then, you feel me? I felt like, I told him “no” at first, and he still went and did it.

COOPER: Do you think he’s a good Muslim?

BROUSSARD: That’s not up to me—that’s not up to me to decide.

COOPER: You told police that you’d admit to killing Bailey even if you didn’t, if it would help the Bakery. Is that what happened there?

BROUSSARD: Yes, it did. They asked me—they said—they said, “Would you—would you—would you lie? Would you lie for the Bakery?” I said, “Yeah.” And then when they—when they asked me that, I was thinking, like, I messed up. I didn’t do a good enough job.

COOPER: You’re saying that, you know, you won’t talk until trial about what you know about who killed Chauncey Bailey. Are you worried if you say what you know about who killed Chauncey Bailey, that your life would be in danger?

BROUSSARD: I’m on 23-hour lockup. Anything—if anything happened to me, you feel me, we’ll know who’s fault it is. So I doubt—I doubt anything would happen. I’m in good hands, I guess.

COOPER: You’re not worried about getting hurt here?

BROUSSARD: Unless they let somebody in my cell. Real.

COOPER: It’s probably not gonna happen.

BROUSSARD: Not gonna happen. That’s why I’m on 23-hour lockup in my cell by myself.

COOPER: I mean, you obviously have a lot of time to think. What do you think now about the Bakery? I mean, when you were there, you were saying that they’re doing good things for the community.

BROUSSARD: The Bakery as I remember it was a good place to work, you know. It helped me—it helped me become a better person. It made me mature, you know, had—I left alone a lot of pettiness. You know, I felt like I wanted to do right, you know. Like, I want to help out my people. I mean, as far as I remember it, for me, you know, just bad stuff happened. That’s it. Bad stuff happened.

COOPER: Is there anything else you want people to know? You want to tell people?

BROUSSARD: What else you want to know?

COOPER: I don’t really have anything else, but I just wanted you to have the opportunity if there’s something you want to say to people, or what people should know about you or should know about the case.

BROUSSARD: I don’t have anything.

COOPER: What do think’s gonna happen?

BROUSSARD: I don’t wanna think on that.

COOPER: Try not to think about it?

BROUSSARD: I mean, I think about it a lot, you know. It’s stressing me out. I never thought I would be in a position like this, you know. Never thought I’d be in a position like this. I’m only 20 years old, you feel me, looking at my life—my life—my life on the line right now. You know? I could say it as many times as I want. Say it as many times as I want that I didn’t do this but, you feel me? That ain’t gonna change nothing. That’s gonna—it’s gonna be up to them twelve people to decide.

COOPER: What do you think they’ll decide?

BROUSSARD: I don’t know what they’ll decide. I don’t know what they’ll decide. I’ll know when that day comes.

COOPER: Okay. Well, thanks for talking to us. Appreciate it.

(Copyright 2011 by CBS San Francisco. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Wire services may have contributed to this report.)

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