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Beaten Giants Fan Transferred To SF General Hospital

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Bryan Stow, escorted by his neurosurgeon Dr. Gabriel Zada (L) and medical staff, is taken from Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center to Bob Hope Airport for a trip to San Francisco General Hospital. (Al Seib-Pool/Getty Images)

Bryan Stow, escorted by his neurosurgeon Dr. Gabriel Zada (L) and medical staff, is taken from Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center to Bob Hope Airport for a trip to San Francisco General Hospital. (Al Seib-Pool/Getty Images)

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SAN FRANCISCO (CBS 5) ― The San Francisco Giants fan who was severely beaten outside Dodgers Stadium nearly seven weeks ago was flown back to the Bay Area Monday where he was admitted to San Francisco General Hospital ― a top trauma center specializing in brain injuries ― to continue his medical care.

Bryan Stow, 42, of Santa Cruz, arrived at SF General shortly before 2 p.m.

“He’s still critically ill, he will be in intensive care,” hospital spokeswoman Rachael Kagan said.

Stow was flown by a small private jet to San Francisco from Los Angeles. The medical jet was staffed by members of American Medical Response, the company that employs Stow as a paramedic.

Stow had been hospitalized at Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center since the March 31 attack, which forced doctors to place him in a medically induced coma because of his touch-and-go condition.

KCBS’ Chris Filippi Reports:

In recent days, doctors said Stow had opened his eyes and made small movements with his arms and legs.

Stow’s new caregivers were assessing his condition on Monday afternoon and were poring over his medical records — including brain images — from the past six weeks. SF General’s chief of neurosurgery, Dr. Geoff Manley, said he and his team expected to give a sense of Stow’s condition by Tuesday.

“We do know that if we make him stable that it will allow for him to have plasticity” in his brain, Manley said. Neuroplasticity is the ability of the brain to change with learning and would be an indicator that Stow could make a good recovery.

During this time of transition, Stow’s family has asked for privacy but said that they would continue to update a website created to keep the public informed of Stow’s condition and of fundraising events, www.support4bryanstow.com.

His family requested that cards, letters and other signs of support be sent to P.O. Box 884, Capitola, CA 95010

On Sunday as they prepared for Monday’s flight north, Ann Stow thanked the people of Los Angeles for supporting her son. The family also said the move was bittersweet because they would be leaving all “the wonderful people” they had met in L.A.

Both ball clubs pledged donations to Stow’s care — $25,000 from the Dodgers and $10,000 from the Giants. His employer, AMR, has promised $5,000.

An outpouring of support for Stow’s family came in the form of grassroots fundraisers, ranging from bowling tournaments to pasta dinners to donated services such as haircuts and fitness classes.

Last month, more than $61,000 was raised at a fundraiser at Dodgers Stadium. A barbecue in San Jose organized by Stow’s co-workers drew more than 2,500 people, and other events were planned.

Police were still looking for two men suspected in the attack, both believed to be Hispanic between 18 and 25 years old, and $150,000 was being offered as a reward for tips leading to their arrests.

Anyone with information about the attack was asked by authorities to call Los Angeles police at (877) 527-3247.

Stow and two friends, all wearing Giants jerseys, were leaving the season opener won by the Dodgers over the Giants when he was attacked by two men in the stadium’s F2 parking lot. One was in Dodgers gear, and both were apparently drunk, according to witnesses.

Just before the attack, Stow texted a family member to say he feared for his safety in the rowdy crowd.

According to police, the men taunted Stow for being a Giants fan and hit him from behind, causing him to fall to the ground. Stow’s friends were also attacked by the men when they tried to intervene.

Following the attack, LAPD Chief Charlie Beck beefed up security at Dodgers Stadium to send a message about the drunken hooliganism and fights that had been breaking out at games in recent years.

Baseball fans have complained that anyone who dares to wear a rival team’s jersey on Dodger turf has too-often been subjected to profane verbal abuse and threats of violence.

The stadium has also dropped plans to offer half-priced beer during a half-dozen games, and is installing more lighting fixtures in the parking lot.

The Giants are due back in Los Angeles for games on Wednesday and Thursday.

(© 2011 CBS San Francisco. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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