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Quan Booed At City Hall; Apologizes To ‘Occupy Oakland’ For Violence

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Oakland Mayor Jean Quan (R) speaks as police chief Howard Jordan looks on during a press conference on October 26, 2011 in Oakland. Oakland Mayor Jean Quan held a press conference to address police action taken on Occupy protesters who staged a demonstration in downtown Oakland on Tuesday evening. Nearly 100 protesters were arrested. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Oakland Mayor Jean Quan (R) speaks as police chief Howard Jordan looks on during a press conference on October 26, 2011 in Oakland. Oakland Mayor Jean Quan held a press conference to address police action taken on Occupy protesters who staged a demonstration in downtown Oakland on Tuesday evening. Nearly 100 protesters were arrested. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

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OAKLAND (CBS SF) — Mayor Jean Quan released a written statement Thursday night addressing “Occupy Oakland” demonstrators, after being booed as she tried to speak to protesters.

Quan apologized in her statement for writing the address rather than speaking directly to the crowd as had been expected.  Quan was seen being hustled into City Hall after protesters yelled and booed when she tried speaking to them directly.

The mayor in her statement apologized for the outcome of Tuesday night’s demonstration—where a heavy police presence kept protesters out of the plaza with tear gas, smoke grenades and rubber bullets.

“It was not what anyone hoped for, ultimately it was my responsibility, and I apologize for what happened,” the statement read.

She said city officials have started an investigation into the use of force by police Tuesday night.

Quan thanked the demonstrators for Wednesday night’s peaceful protest and said she would continue to order “a minimal police presence.”

KCBS’ Chris Filippi Reports:

The mayor pledged to support the Occupy movement but asked for several things in return: direct communication between Occupy Oakland representatives and city staff; that demonstrators maintain healthy and safe conditions at gatherings and that they provide access to public safety employees in case of emergency.

The final request was that the demonstrators abide by the hours set aside for demonstrations at Frank Ogawa Plaza—between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m.—and not camp out overnight.

KCBS’ Holly Quan Reports:

Related Coverage:
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Vet Injured In ‘Occupy Oakland’ Protest Upgraded To Fair Condition
CBS 5 Poll: Mayor Quan’s Approval Rating Drops Further
‘Occupy Oakland’ Protesters Return To Frank Ogawa Plaza
Iraq War Veteran Suffers Skull Fracture In Occupy Oakland Violence
Mayor Quan ‘Very Saddened’ By Protest Violence

Earlier on Thursday, a few tents were being pitched in the plaza and it appeared that demonstrators were restoring their encampment.

“From what I can tell the encampment is starting to be rebuilt,” Brian Glasscock, 20, said Thursday afternoon.

Glasscock was one of around 100 demonstrators who were arrested during a police raid on the plaza encampment Tuesday morning.

Quan in her statement also mentioned Scott Olsen, the Iraq War veteran injured during Tuesday night’s protest. She said she visited with Olsen and his family Thursday “because I was concerned about his recovery.”

According to a statement by Iraq Veterans Against War, a group Olsen was active in, the 24-year-old suffered a fractured skull when he was hit by a police projectile during the protests.

Prior to Thursday night’s Occupy Oakland general assembly meeting, demonstrators gathered at a vigil for Olsen at Frank Ogawa Plaza.

scott olsen vigil 130653397 Quan Booed At City Hall; Apologizes To ‘Occupy Oakland’ For Violence

People hold photos of Scott Olsen, an Iraq veteran who was seriously injured during a standoff between Occupy Oakland and Oakland police, during a candlelight vigil in front of Oakland City Hall on October 27, 2011 in Oakland. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Several of Olsen’s friends spoke, including one of the people who rushed to help Olsen when he was injured. She was one of many who criticized the officers’ actions and response Tuesday night.

“We were all shouting for medical assistance and instead of giving us that, there was a flash grenade thrown into the crowd,” she said.

Olsen’s friend and fellow veteran Keith Shannon lauded his friend’s selfless character. “Scott Olsen is the perfect example of someone who cares for everyone, even in a situation that doesn’t directly affect himself.”

When the general assembly meeting began a short time later, one speaker suggested that the city lower flags to half-mast “to recognize the violence the city of Oakland did to Scott Olsen and other citizens.”

(Copyright 2011 by CBS San Francisco. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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