About The Bay: Learning From Distracted Driving The Hard Way

SAN FRANCISCO (KCBS) — With the increase of smartphones and all they can do, distracted driving is something we hear about more and more. Even with all the attention on the news, you might ignore the warnings because of the constant need to stay in touch.

I keep my eyes on the road mostly, but have taken a few seconds to dial on my phone, or check a quick email. I knew it was stupid, but I’d even edit video for my TV job.

Last week as I was inching along Highway 101 at about four miles an hour and I tried to figure out how to play a phone message over speakerphone. I looked up in time to slam on the brakes, but it was too late. I hit the car in front of me, but luckily no one was hurt.

KCBS’ Mike Sugerman Reports:

Two years ago Calli Anne Murray, a two-year-old, was killed by a texting driver in Rohnert Park. Her grandfather Al Andreas is trying to get the word out on the dangers of distracted driving.

“We lost her. We want everything that happened because of it to change other people’s behavior,” Andreas said.

I didn’t kill or hurt anyone before I learned not to be a distracted driver.

I’m hoping this doesn’t just wash over your brain like it originally did with mine.

(Copyright 2012 by CBS San Francisco. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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