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Narsai David Recipe: Marmalade (Orange, Grapefruit, Lemon, Lime)

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(AP)

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BERKELEY (KCBS) – Great marmalade is really easy to make at home, especially during late winter into early spring when there are so many varieties of citrus on the market that all make beautiful marmalade.

Whether you choose the tender skin of a tangerine or the tough skin on a bergamot orange, the whole fruit goes into the marmalade, rind and all.

In fact, a blend of different citrus fruits such as orange and lemon make a very nice marmalade. Also very appealing is pink grapefruit, which gives the marmalade a golden, pink color and a delicious taste. Meyer lemons make an exceptional marmalade with their elegant floral aroma. Finally, blood oranges create the most unusual rich color for a marmalade.

KCBS’ Food and Wine Editor Narsai David:

Narsai’s Marmalade

(Orange, Grapefruit, Lemon, Lime)

Wash whole fruit under running water. Cut away stem and any trademarks on the skin. Cut fruit in half and squeeze out the juice. Reserve juice. Cut the hollowed out shells in half again. Put the rinds in a pot, cover with a lot of water, bring to a boil and simmer until tender. Pull out and discard all the tough interior membranes.

If you’re blending different fruits, keep the rinds separate at this point, as the cooking time varies. Orange rinds may be tender in 20 minutes. Grapefruit may take 25 minutes. Firm lemons and limes take up to 30 minutes.

Drain in a colander and discard the liquid. You may now slice the rind thinly, or grind through the chili plate of a meat grinder or chop in a food processor as you desire.

Combine the rind and the juice in a measuring cup. Add the same volume of sugar as the combined volume of fruit juice and rind. Cook over moderate heat, stirring frequently until it almost jells, generally about 10 to 15 minutes. There is so much pectin in citrus that the marmalade tends to stiffen up a bit in the jar until it cools.

Narsai David is the KCBS Food and Wine Editor. He has been a successful restaurateur, chef, TV host, and columnist in the Bay Area spanning four decades. You can hear him Saturdays at 10:53 a.m., 12:53 p.m. and 4:53 p.m., and at 2:53 a.m. Sunday on KCBS All News 740AM and 106.9FM.

(Copyright 2013 by CBS San Francisco. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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