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Local

BART And Unions Still Far Apart As Talks Resume

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A Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) train sits idle at the Millbrae station on July 3, 2013 in Millbrae. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

A Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) train sits idle at the Millbrae station on July 3, 2013 in Millbrae. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

JEFFREY%20SCHAUB Jeffrey Schaub
Jeffrey Schaub is a Bay Area broadcast news veteran. From 1990 to 201...
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SAN FRANCISCO (KCBS) — BART management met with union leaders again Monday to try to reach an agreement before the union employees’ contract expires at midnight Sunday, a management spokesman said.

Transit district spokesman Rick Rice said management is meeting with leaders of Service Employees International Union Local 1021, which represents 1,430 mechanics, custodians and clerical workers, this morning and with leaders of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1555, which represents 945 station agents, train operators and clerical workers, Monday afternoon.

The talks are being facilitated by two state mediators who sometimes meet with the parties separately and other times meet with all of them together in the same room.

Prior to Monday, both sides said that they have yet to make any headway in negotiations.

BART Director Zachary Mallet was firmly resolute that the present system is unsustainable and that workers need to contribute more.

“They pay nothing into their pension and medical, it’s just $92 a month,” he said.

SEIU Local 1021 executive director Pete Castelli said negotiations have been ongoing but have been proceeding more slowly than they should because BART’s lead negotiator, Thomas Hock, has been on vacation for the past 10 days.

“If BART can get their act together and actually bargain with us meaningfully, we can still get an agreement and that’s the goal, but we’re not ruling out any option. I’ll just put it that way,” he said.

Castelli said that means the parties have only been able to talk about small supplemental issues during that time instead of the bigger sticking points, which he said are wages, benefits and worker safety.

“The way we look at it, is we stopped the strike at the request of the governor and the governor’s mediators. We’re not ready to say ‘yes’ when the clock strikes at midnight, on the 4th we will.”

But Rice said Hock’s vacation was approved by the state mediator back on July 7 and that the parties have still been able to talk about important matters in his absence.

“There have been more meetings than originally scheduled and there’s still plenty of time to reach an agreement,” Rice said.

Hock will be back at the bargaining table on Tuesday, and the mediators’ schedule includes talks every day until the contract expires on Sunday night, he said.

Castelli said, “We will have hope that an agreement can be reached but we don’t have high hopes.”

He said that is because union leaders believe BART management hired Hock to be their lead negotiator so that he could force workers to go on strike and eventually “cave in” and accept an unfavorable contract.

Rice denied Castelli’s allegation, saying, “BART is absolutely trying to reach an agreement and believe a deal can still be reached that keeps the trains running.”

BART employees went on strike the morning of July 1 but late on July 4 they agreed to extend their previous contract for 30 days, until Aug.  4. They returned to work the afternoon of July 5.

The four-and-a-half day strike clogged local highways and caused commute headaches for Bay Area residents.

Transit officials fear that the commuting nightmare could be repeated next Monday if BART doesn’t reach an agreement with its employees by Sunday night.

(Copyright 2013 by CBS San Francisco. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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