kpix-7-2013-masthead kcbs 7-2013-masthead

Local

Jahi McMath Receives Feeding, Breathing Tubes

View Comments
Jahi McMath (family photo)

Jahi McMath (family photo)

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up
Trending Stories On CBS SF

dsc 0039 Jahi McMath Receives Feeding, Breathing TubesOakland Zoo Animals Feast On Spilled Fruit From Monday’s Truck Crash

manservants Jahi McMath Receives Feeding, Breathing Tubes‘ManServants’ Startup Promises Women Pampering Not Prostitution

nonoise Jahi McMath Receives Feeding, Breathing TubesMonterey Restaurant’s ‘No Noisy Kids’ Policy Has Parents Pouting

pa crash Jahi McMath Receives Feeding, Breathing TubesCar Plows Through Sidewalk Cafe In Palo Alto; Multiple People Hurt

home invasion Jahi McMath Receives Feeding, Breathing TubesTeen Boy Tied Up During Home Invasion Robbery in San Jose’s Almaden Valley Neighborhood

OAKLAND (CBS / AP) — A 13-year-old Bay Area girl who was declared brain dead after suffering complications from sleep apnea surgery has been given the feeding and breathing tubes that her family had been trying to obtain for weeks.

Christopher Dolan, the attorney for the girl’s family, said doctors inserted the gastric tube and tracheostomy tube Wednesday at the undisclosed facility where Jahi McMath was taken Jan. 5.

The procedure was a success, Dolan said, and Jahi is getting the treatment that her family believes she should have gotten 28 days ago, when doctors at Children’s Hospital Oakland first declared her brain dead.

Phil Matier: McMath Case At Center Of Malpractice Campaign

Jahi underwent tonsil surgery Dec. 9, then began bleeding heavily before going into cardiac arrest and being declared brain dead Dec. 12.

Her mother has refused to believe Jahi is dead and went to court to prevent her daughter from being taken off a ventilator.

Jahi’s uncle, Omari Sealey, said Monday that she is now being cared for at a facility that shares her family’s belief that she still is alive.

The new facility has “been very welcoming with open arms,” Sealey said. “They have beliefs just like ours.”

Neither Dolan nor the family would disclose the name or location of that facility, which took the eighth-grader after a weekslong battle by her family to prevent Children’s Hospital Oakland from removing her from the breathing machine that has kept her heart beating.

But medical experts said the ventilator won’t work indefinitely and caring for a patient whom three doctors have said is legally dead is likely to be challenging because — unlike someone in a coma — there is no blood flow or electrical activity in either her cerebrum or the brain stem that controls breathing.

The bodies of brain dead patients kept on ventilators gradually deteriorate, eventually causing blood pressure to plummet and the heart to stop, said Dr. Paul Vespa, director of neurocritical care at the University of California, Los Angeles, who has no role in McMath’s care. The process usually takes only days but can sometimes continue for months, medical experts say.

“The bodies are really in an artificial state. It requires a great deal of manipulation in order to keep the circulation going,” Vespa said.

Brain-dead people may look like they’re sleeping, he added, but it’s “an illusion based on advanced medical techniques.”

Sealey, the girl’s uncle, said Monday that Jahi’s mother, Nailah Winkfield, is relieved her persistence paid off and “sounds happier.” He criticized Children’s Hospital for repeatedly telling Winkfield they did not need her permission to remove Jahi from the ventilator because the girl was dead.

Sealey told reporters Monday that Jahi traveled by ground from Children’s Hospital to the unnamed facility and there were no complications in the transfer, suggesting she may still be in California.

The $55,000 in private donations the family has raised since taking the case public helped cover the carefully choreographed handoff to the critical care team and transportation to the new location, Sealey said.

“If her heart stops beating while she is on the respirator, we can accept that because it means she is done fighting,” he said. “We couldn’t accept them pulling the plug on her early.”

© Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus