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U.S. Penalizes Asiana Airlines $500K For Failure To Help Families In SFO Crash

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Passengers who were involved in the San Fransisco plane crash arrive at Incheon International Airport on July 8, 2013 in Incheon, South Korea. Two people are dead and more than 180 injured after an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 aircraft coming from Seoul, South Korea crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport on July 6, 2013.  (Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

Passengers who were involved in the San Fransisco plane crash arrive at Incheon International Airport on July 8, 2013 in Incheon, South Korea. Two people are dead and more than 180 injured after an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 aircraft coming from Seoul, South Korea crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport on July 6, 2013. (Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

SAN FRANCISCO (CBS / AP) – Asiana Airlines has been penalized $500,000 for failing to assist family members of passengers on a flight that crashed last year at San Francisco airport, federal transportation officials said Tuesday.

The fine announced by the U.S. Department of Transportation was a first: No airline has broken U.S. laws that require prompt and generous assistance to the loved ones of crash victims.

Three people died and dozens were injured on July 6 when Asiana Flight 214 clipped a seawall while landing.

An investigation by the Department of Transportation concluded that some family members had not been contacted two days after the crash, and it took five days to reach the families of all 291 passengers.

“The last thing families and passengers should have to worry about at such a stressful time is how to get information from their carrier,” U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said in a prepared statement.

Many of the families live in South Korea or China, meaning the airline was their main source of information on the crash half a world away.

In a statement emailed to The Associated Press, Asiana spokeswoman Hyomin Lee said, “Asiana provided extensive support to the passengers and their families following the accident and will continue to do so.”

According to a consent order the airline signed with the department, Asiana will pay $400,000 in a fine and gets a $100,000 credit for “costs in sponsoring multiple industry-wide conferences and training sessions in 2013, 2014 and 2015, to provide lessons learned.”

Federal investigators also said Asiana did not actively encourage contact from families, failing to widely publicize a toll-free help line until the day after the crash. When family members did call, they were initially routed to a reservations line rather than a crisis hotline.

Asiana also lacked translators and personnel trained in crash response, the transportation department found.

In the late 1990s, after airlines were roundly criticized for ignoring desperate requests for information after crashes, Congress required carriers to dedicate significant attention to families of passengers.

Last fall, the AP reviewed plans filed by two dozen foreign airlines and found cases in which carriers had not updated their family assistance plans as required.

Since AP’s story, several airlines have updated family assistance plans and filed new paperwork with the Department of Transportation. Among them is Asiana’s bigger rival, Korean Air.

© Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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