kpix-7-2013-masthead kcbs 7-2013-masthead

Local

San Francisco Wants To Use Recycled Water To Clean Streets

View Comments
Street sweeper. (CBS)

Street sweeper. (CBS)

JEFFREY%20SCHAUB Jeffrey Schaub
Jeffrey Schaub is a Bay Area broadcast news veteran. From 1990 to 201...
Read More

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up
Trending Stories On CBS SF

jimfarrell1 San Francisco Wants To Use Recycled Water To Clean Streets  97-Year-Old Says He Was Kicked Out Of Napa Retirement Home For Playing Music

452285552 8 San Francisco Wants To Use Recycled Water To Clean Streets  Around 100 Attendees Heading To Australia AIDS Conference Among Victims Of Downed Malaysia Airlines Flight

san francisco israel palestine protest San Francisco Wants To Use Recycled Water To Clean Streets  Dueling Protests Face Off On Israel-Palestine Conflict Outside Jewish Temple In San Francisco

san francisco international airport 111810 e1338402140100 San Francisco Wants To Use Recycled Water To Clean Streets  Apparently Drunk Man Arrested For Posing As TSA Agent, Patting Down Women At SFO

lawn spray painting San Francisco Wants To Use Recycled Water To Clean Streets  SoCal Homeowners Spray-Painting Lawns Green To Avoid Water Fees During Drought

SAN FRANCISCO (KCBS)— San Francisco is looking into using recycled water in its street cleaning vehicles instead of the Hetch Hetchy drinking water used to wash city streets.

The San Francisco Examiner reports that the city’s Department of Public Works (DPW) has been conducting a series of meetings to see what can be done to cut down on use of drinking water, including the possibility of building an additional water-recycling plant on the city’s east side, but that could take years to build.

Mayor Ed Lee in turn, has asked city residents and businesses to cut back on their water use 10 percent, but he wants city government to do the same.

San Francisco only has two wastewater treatment plants that could possibly be used to fill the street sweepers, but they lack the necessary hookups to get the wastewater from the plants to the city-owned vehicles.

Work is underway to make about 4 million gallons of non-potable water available per day. By comparison, East Bay Municipal Utility District cranks out 9 million gallons of treated wastewater each day, but nearly all of that goes to Chevron for the cooling towers at its Richmond refinery.

San Jose has plans to create 100 million gallons of waste water a day by the year 2022.

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus