kpix-7-2013-masthead kcbs 7-2013-masthead

Local

Volunteers Provide Knitted Nests To Help Rehabilitate Abandoned Bird Chicks In San Rafael

View Comments
(CBS) Don Ford
Don Ford joined KPIX 5 as a Multi-Media Journalist (MMJ) in 2011. He...
Read More

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up
Trending Stories On CBS SF

quake flash 082614 Volunteers Provide Knitted Nests To Help Rehabilitate Abandoned Bird Chicks In San RafaelSome Bay Area Residents Report Mysterious Flashes In The Sky During Napa Quake

desmond hague elevator Volunteers Provide Knitted Nests To Help Rehabilitate Abandoned Bird Chicks In San RafaelCaught On Camera: Alleged Dog Abuse By CEO Of Company Tied To 49ers, Giants

nicholas dillon copy Volunteers Provide Knitted Nests To Help Rehabilitate Abandoned Bird Chicks In San RafaelTeenager Crushed By Chimney In Napa Earthquake Speaks From Hospital Bed

454087234 8 Volunteers Provide Knitted Nests To Help Rehabilitate Abandoned Bird Chicks In San RafaelStrong Magnitude 6.0 Earthquake Rocks San Francisco Bay Area, Dozens Hurt, Significant Damage In Napa

keyframe22 Volunteers Provide Knitted Nests To Help Rehabilitate Abandoned Bird Chicks In San RafaelCaught On Camera: Concord Thief Uses Mystery Electronic Device To Break Into Car

SAN RAFAEL (CBS SF) — A wildlife conservation group in Marin County that cares for hundreds of orphaned baby birds has enlisted an army of knitters to make nests for the rehabilitating chicks.

San Rafael-based WildCare rehabilitates thousands of wild animals a year, including hundreds of bird chicks who fall from nests during spring nesting season.

At their rescue center in San Rafael, workers use custom-made nests knitted and donated by volunteers to house the rehabilitating chicks, instead of the old, hard, plastic nests they used to use.

WildCare made a request earlier this year for local knitters to weave the bird nests and the response was overwhelming. “We’ve gotten over a thousand of them now,” said Alison Hermance, WildCare Communications Manager.

“It’s a nice way to have the little baby birds have a warm place to sleep,” said bird nest knitter Teri Rockas.

WildCare says they can always use more knitted nests in case anyone else has a hankering to make and donate them.

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 53,874 other followers