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Volunteers Provide Knitted Nests To Help Rehabilitate Abandoned Bird Chicks In San Rafael

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(CBS) Don Ford
Don Ford joined KPIX 5 as a Multi-Media Journalist (MMJ) in 2011. He...
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SAN RAFAEL (CBS SF) — A wildlife conservation group in Marin County that cares for hundreds of orphaned baby birds has enlisted an army of knitters to make nests for the rehabilitating chicks.

San Rafael-based WildCare rehabilitates thousands of wild animals a year, including hundreds of bird chicks who fall from nests during spring nesting season.

At their rescue center in San Rafael, workers use custom-made nests knitted and donated by volunteers to house the rehabilitating chicks, instead of the old, hard, plastic nests they used to use.

WildCare made a request earlier this year for local knitters to weave the bird nests and the response was overwhelming. “We’ve gotten over a thousand of them now,” said Alison Hermance, WildCare Communications Manager.

“It’s a nice way to have the little baby birds have a warm place to sleep,” said bird nest knitter Teri Rockas.

WildCare says they can always use more knitted nests in case anyone else has a hankering to make and donate them.

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