CHICAGO (AP) — Four black people accused of beating a mentally disabled white man and broadcasting the attack on Facebook appeared Friday in court, where a judge asked them, “Where was your sense of decency?”

Prosecutors offered new details of the assault, explaining that one of the suspects demanded $300 from the victim’s mother and that the beating started in a van and continued at a house.

The suspects are accused of forcing the victim to drink toilet water and kiss the floor, stuffing a sock into his mouth, taping his mouth shut and binding his hands with a belt.

Authorities say they also threatened him with a knife and taunted him with profanities against white people and President-elect Donald Trump.

The 18-year-old victim, who is from a Chicago suburb, suffers from schizophrenia and attention-deficit disorder, authorities said.

The suspects are all are charged with two hate crimes — one because the kid was disabled and one because of race. They are also accused of kidnapping and battery, among other offenses.

The suspects were identified as Brittany Covington and Tesfaye Cooper, both of Chicago, and Jordan Hill, of suburban Carpentersville. All are 18. A fourth suspect was identified as Covington’s 24-year-old sister, Tanishia Covington, also of Chicago.

Cook County Associate Judge Maria Kuriakos Ciesil denied bond for all four.

Two of the suspects were arrested as juveniles on armed robbery and other serious charges.

Hill was arrested in 2015 on allegations of armed robbery, possession of a stolen vehicle and residential burglary. Chicago police said they did not know the disposition of those arrests by suburban officers.

Tanishia Covington was arrested in 2007 on attempted armed robbery and aggravated battery charges. Police records do not show any convictions as a juvenile. As an adult, she was arrested on charges of battery and aggravated assault, but those charges were dropped.

The beating was captured on cellphone video by one of the assailants and has since been viewed millions of times on social media.

The uproar over the beating intensified the glare on Chicago after a bloody year of violent crime and protests against Mayor Rahm Emanuel and a police department that has been accused of using excessive force and hushing-up wrongdoing. The department has also been the subject of a long civil-rights investigation by the Justice Department, which is expected to report its findings soon.

The incident also stirred emotions still raw after a presidential election campaign that split the nation. The case heightened political tensions on social media, with some conservatives suggesting it was linked to the Black Lives Matter movement. Police said there was no indication of any connection.

Excerpts of the video posted by Chicago media outlets show the victim with his mouth taped shut and slumped in a corner of a room. At least two assailants are seen cutting off his sweatshirt, and others taunt him off camera. The video shows a wound on the top of the man’s head. One person pushes the man’s head with his or her foot.

A red band also appears to be around the victim’s hands. He was tied up for four to five hours, authorities said.

The incident began New Year’s Eve, when the victim and alleged assailant Jordan Hill met at a suburban McDonald’s to begin what both the victim and his parents believed would be a sleepover, police said.

Instead, Hill drove the victim around in a stolen van for a couple of days, ending up at a home in Chicago, where two of the other suspects lived, Detective Commander Kevin Duffin said.

The victim told police what began as playful fighting escalated. A downstairs neighbor who heard noises threatened to call police. When two of the suspects left and kicked down the neighbor’s door, the victim escaped. A police officer later spotted the bloodied and obviously disoriented man wandering down a street.

The victim’s parents reported him missing Monday evening, two days after last hearing from him. The police report said the victim’s mother knew the first name of her son’s friend — Jordan — but wasn’t clear on his last name. The report also noted that the victim “does not like telling his parents who he’s with.”

The parents later received text messages “from persons claiming to be holding him captive,” police said. While investigating the messages, police discovered the Facebook video.

© Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments (5)
  1. George Kowal says:

    Ohhh, so the parents of the victim didn’t hesitate to allow their disabled boy to run around (for several days) with a HS acquaintance who they didn’t even know his last name. PATHETIC

  2. What is this some of a lame liberal transfer of blame by attempting to make it the parent’s fault? Only the deluded could think of something that sick. The video was posted online, so now even the far left liberals Chicago prosecutors have to call it a hate crime of black on white. These black thugs have been coddled by a school system that makes them victims, therefore, they are empowered and exempt of civilized behavior. If the tractor had been invented 200 years earlier, the US would not have to endure the uncivilized 13 percent of the population doing 70 percent of the violent crime and 52 percent of the murders.

  3. Jimmy Locke says:

    I would hope prosecutors will go for the maximum penalties for the assailants. Considering their criminal pasts it is obvious their parents have been out of the picture for some time. The victim’s parents were lax also as a disabled or mentally ill person usually requires extra attention to protect them from bullies and other dangers.

  4. Typical young black person behavior. This is why we should offer free ship rides back to Africa. They would be better off back in their homeland eating their own feces and drinking their own pizz. Thankfully, AIDS is still a real problem in this backwards segment of our society.

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