Some graduates poised to enter college often are undecided upon a major when starting their higher education. One critical field of study to consider is psychology, with one segment – industrial-organizational psychologists — estimated to be the fastest growing occupation in the country. One leading expert, who received her doctorate in psychology from a local university, is Rosché Brown, Psy.D., whose rewarding career brought her full circle as an educator at Argosy University San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA).

(Photo Courtesy of Rosché Brown, Psy.D.)

(Photo Courtesy of Rosché Brown, Psy.D.)

What is your background and education?

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“I obtained my B.S. in psychology from Xavier University of Louisiana in New Orleans and my master’s and doctorate in clinical psychology from Argosy University, San Francisco Bay Area. I am a licensed psychologist and have worked in Alameda, Contra Costa and Marin counties since 2006, offering individual, family, and group therapy services with a diverse collection of clients. My interests include at-risk youth with problematic behaviors, transitional aged foster youth, working with African-American families, and combining spirituality with mental health.”

What type of courses do you teach at Argosy University SFBA?

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“In the undergraduate program, I taught interpersonal effectiveness, ethics, research methods, statistics, child and adolescent, and physiological psychology. In the counseling program, I teach theories in counseling, research and program evaluation, counseling skills, child and adolescent, and practicum seminar as well as serve as the director of training for MFT/LPCC students field placements. In the Ed.D. program, I am dissertation coordinator and teach clinical supervision as well as serve as chair and committee member on dissertations.”

What career advice can you offer to current and prospective students?

“First and foremost remember what brought you to this field; they often refer to psychologist as the “wounded healer.”  Remembering this can aid you in being relatable, compassionate, and empathetic to your client’s experience. Second, always practice self-care because you are your best tool so use supervision, consultation with colleagues, your own therapy, ‘me’ time to re-energize ‘you’ for this difficult work. Academically, apply yourself in all learning aspects. Be your best self and shine at field placements because they are your potential future employers or referral base for clients, workshops, or other future endeavors.”

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Randy Yagi is a freelance writer covering all things San Francisco. In 2012, he was awarded a Media Fellowship from Stanford University. His work can be found on Examiner.com Examiner.com.