FRESNO (CBS / AP) — A surging wildfire raced through California mountains and foothills west of Yosemite National Park on Wednesday, forcing thousands to flee tiny, Gold Rush-era towns, destroying 29 structures and wafting a smoky haze over the park’s landmark Half Dome rock face.

The 4-day-old blaze nearly doubled in size overnight from about 40 square miles to more than 70 square miles, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said.

At its closest, the blaze was still about 35 miles from the boundary of Yosemite, where campgrounds are open, park spokesman Scott Gediman said.

Gov. Jerry Brown has declared an emergency, bolstering the state’s resources to battle the fire that he said has forced thousands of residents to flee and is expected to continue burning.

The fire closed one of several roads into the park during its busy summer season, and rangers warned visitors with respiratory problems to be mindful of the haze, Gediman said.

The fire has forced more than 5,000 people from their homes, officials said.

Heavy smoke hung in the air over Mariposa, a town of 2,000 with century-old wooden buildings, including what’s touted as the oldest active courthouse west of the Rocky Mountains.

Tony Munoz, 63 and his wife, Edna Munoz, 59, were ordered out of their home outside Mariposa on Tuesday. They grabbed clothes, medicine and their three dogs and a cat and fled.

Driving out on narrow roads clogged by others getting out, “you couldn’t even see the sun” in the ash-filled sky, said Tony Munoz, a school custodian.

Downtown Mariposa was empty except for firefighters and other emergency workers. The entire town was evacuated.

Fierce flames were visible on slopes about a mile away.

The fire was threatening about 1,500 homes and other buildings, after already destroying eight structures. It’s not clear what type of buildings burned.

It is burning near Highway 49, a historical route winding its way up California foothills of the western Sierra Nevada dotted with little towns that sprouted along the gold Mother Lode that drew miners to California in the 1800s.

Record rain and snowfall in the mountains this winter abruptly ended California’s five-year drought. But that has increased the challenge for crews battling flames feeding on dense vegetation.

“There’s ample fuel and steep terrain,” Cal Fire spokeswoman DeeDee Garcia said. “It makes firefighting difficult.”

Statewide, about 6,000 firefighters were battling 17 large wildfires, including about 3,175 at the fire near Yosemite.

A strike team out of Clovis and an inmate crew out of Miramonte made an overnight stand to make sure flames from the Detwiler fire didn’t cross Highway 140, east of Catheys Valley. Highway 140 is a common route into the national park and has been closed.

Cal Fire spokesman John Bruno said, “There was a real challenge. This past weekend there were lots of fires. A lot of those fires have been contained so as resources on those fires become available then they divert them to this new incident.”

Bruno said there are many homes on small roads tucked into the mountains and that many of the gold rush buildings in Mariposa have wood frames, making them highly combustible.

Planes are continuing to drop flame retardant across the area.

Smoke from the fire is wafting as far away as Boise, Idaho, which is over 500 miles away.

In Nevada, firefighters got a handle on a wind-driven wildfire that destroyed four homes and damaged several more. Bureau of Land Management spokesman Greg Deimel said Wednesday that no one was hurt in the fire that broke out in extremely windy conditions just east of Elko.

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Comments (3)
  1. There is a converted 747 TANKER, fully loaded and FAA certified (and fire tested) READY TO FIGHT THE DETWILER FIRE but CalFire will not use it. Too expensive! Meanwhile people loose their homes and livestock and firefighters risk their lives. What is the excuse now that Governor Brown declared emergency and released additional funds???