RICHMOND (CBS SF) — Legislation that would expand the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historical Park in Richmond has been introduced in the House of Representatives and the U.S. Congress.

Rep. Mark DeSaulnier, D-Walnut Creek, introduced the Rosie the Riveter National Historic Site Expansion Act (HR 7585), which would add Nystrom Elementary School to the park.

Companion legislation is being introduced in the U.S. Senate by Sens. Kamala Harris and Dianne Feinstein.

Rosie Rally in Richmond

An estimated 1,000 people attended the Rosie Rally Home Front Festival in Richmond Saturday. The event commemorates the iconic, if fictional, World War II female worker known as “Rosie the Riveter.” (Bay City News Photo)

“Richmond and West Contra Costa played a pivotal role in our nation’s efforts in World War II. We owe it to the families who helped write that history to share their stories. By expanding this culturally significant site, visitors will have the opportunity to learn about the Nystrom School, which was built to teach the children of shipyard workers,” DeSaulnier said.

Nystrom Elementary was part of a planned development that includes the historic Maritime Child Development Center, already preserved as part of the park, and the Nystrom Housing Area, which the city of Richmond has slated for future preservation and redevelopment.

National Park Service Ranger Betty Reid Soskin

In this July 12, 2016, file photo, National Park Service Ranger Betty Reid Soskin smiles at the Rosie the Riveter World War II Home Front National Historical Park in Richmond, Calif. The nation’s oldest park ranger will be awarded a Congressional Record statement Friday, Oct. 7, 2016, at the museum and national historic park where she works in Richmond. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, file)

“I’m proud to join Rep. DeSaulnier on this legislation to expand the Rosie the Riveter National Historic Park to include the Nystrom School — this will allow visitors to learn more about the history of the Richmond shipyards and the families who lived and worked there to support the war effort in World War II,” Harris said in a statement.

“It’s important that we remember the sacrifices made by all Americans during World War II. Nystrom Elementary School was built to accommodate the influx of families moving to Richmond to work at the shipyards. Preserving it as part of the historic park will help tell the story of the war effort,” Feinstein said in a statement.

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