SAN JOSE (KPIX) — Tuesday marked the one year anniversary of the murder of George Floyd as his family met with President Joe Biden in hopes he would sign a police reform bill into law.

But the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act is still in the hands of lawmakers who continue to negotiate the proposed law.

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Last year, Floyd was killed in police custody. Video of the incident went viral, showing now former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin kneeling on his neck. Chauvin was recently convicted in Floyd’s death, and several more officers at the scene are awaiting trial.

Floyd’s killing sparked months of protests calling for an end to police brutality, social injustice, and communities demanded police reform as well as the defunding of police departments and congressional changes.

However, one year later, many believe those conversations have stalled.

“Every movement forward we’ve had to fight for, scream about, protest for,” said activist Cat Brooks. “We’ve got a long way to go and the fact that we’re still having a conversation with our electeds about whether or not to divest from violent policing and invest in our communities when our communities are clearly in crisis is very telling.”

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“It’s dissipated,” said San Jose State University Assistant Professor of Public Relations Dr. Shaun Fletcher. “A lot of folks went silent after we were able to pivot when our economy started to open, when elections took place.”

Collin Chiverton, a Bay Area resident, agrees. He said in the last year since Floyd’s death he’s experienced racism in the region.

“It’s a very hard thing to deal with every single day,” Chiverton said. “This is not a past tense situation. Racism is very alive and well today.”

While some cities, such as Los Altos, have been successful at forming a citizen police task force, others like San Jose’s police reform committee have not been so successful. The group fell apart after several members left; alleging discussion over police reform was non-existent.

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“It’s not new, it is America’s playbook,” Fletcher said. “I would love to see politicians, show us your work. I would love to see organizations leaders across different industries, show us your work. What have you done over the last year.”