OAKLAND (CBS SF) – Ray Fosse, a legendary broadcaster with the Oakland A’s and catcher during the team’s 1970s dynasty, died after a longtime battle with cancer, his family announced Wednesday.

“It is with a heavy heart that Carol Fosse, Ray Fosse’s wife of 51 years, shares the sad news that Ray Fosse lost his battle to cancer on October 13, 2021 after silently fighting it for the past 16 years. Carol and daughters, Nikki and Lindsey, send their love out to family, friends and fans that mourn his loss with them,” his family said in a statement. Fosse was 74.

Fosse, who was a part of the team’s radio and television broadcasts since 1986, stepped away from the broadcast booth in August after publicly revealing his cancer diagnosis.

The A’s also released a statement, which read in part, “Few people epitomize what it means to be an Athletic more than Ray. He was the type of franchise icon who always made sure every player, coach, colleague, and fan knew that they were part of the Oakland A’s family.”

“Few have made as significant impact on our franchise as Ray,” team owner John Fisher said in his own statement. “It was a pleasure to watch his fierce determination as a player and a gift to have him in our front office as a broadcaster.

Former A’s players also expressed their condolences.

Born in 1947, Fosse made his MLB debut in September 1967 for the Cleveland Indians. During his 12-year career, he was a two-time All-Star, two-time World Series champion with the A’s in 1973 and 1974 and a Gold Glove Award-winner.

In 1970, Fosse was involved in perhaps one of the most shocking moments in All-Star Game history, when Pete Rose barreled over him to win the annual exhibition between the top players in the American and National leagues. The collision at the Midsummer Classic fractured and separated his left shoulder, and he told The Associated Press in 2015 his body still ached 45 years later.

“As much as it’s shown, I don’t have to see it on TV as a replay to know what happened. It’s fresh,” he said.