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Oakland Police Accuse Quan Of Mixed Messages On Occupy Protests

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A Occupy Oakland protester stands in front of the police line as the police block streets near the Oakland City Hall on October 25, 2011. (Kimhiro Hoshino/AFP/Getty Images)

A Occupy Oakland protester stands in front of the police line as the police block streets near the Oakland City Hall on October 25, 2011. (Kimhiro Hoshino/AFP/Getty Images)

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SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) – The head of the union that represents Oakland’s police officers said Tuesday that officers are “very confused” about what he said are mixed messages from the city’s leaders about the Occupy Oakland encampment in front of City Hall.

“Someone needs to step up and lead the city,” said Sgt. Dom Arotzarena, of the Oakland Police Officers Association.

In an open letter to Oakland residents, Arotzarena said that on Oct. 25, Mayor Jean Quan ordered police “to clear out the encampments at Frank Ogawa Plaza and to keep protesters out of the plaza.”

KCBS’ Doug Sovern & Bob Melrose Report:

He said, “We performed the job that the mayor’s administration asked us to do, being fully aware that past protests in Oakland have resulted in rioting, violence and destruction of property.”

But Arotzarena said that on Oct. 26, the following day, “the mayor allowed protesters back in — to camp out at the very place they were evacuated from the day before.”

To add to the confusion, he said, Quan’s administration issued a memo on Friday giving all employees, except for police officers, permission to take the day off during a general strike scheduled for Wednesday.

Arotzarena said, “That’s hundreds of city workers encouraged to take off work to participate in the protest against ‘the establishment.’ But aren’t the mayor and her administration part of the establishment they are paying city employees to protest?”

Arotzarena said, “It is all very confusing to us.”

Quan’s office said city employees who want to participate in the strike are asked to request approval from their supervisors and use leave or a floating furlough day, or taking time off without pay — sick leave won’t apply.

Arotzarena said the city has ordered all of its 645 police officers to show up for work on Wednesday, including those who were scheduled to have the day off.

He said it cost more than $1 million for police to respond to the Occupy Oakland protests last week and that taxpayers will be on the hook for additional costs for responding to the general strike on Wednesday, which protesters say will include an attempt to shut down the Port of Oakland, which is the fifth busiest port in the United States. A spokeswoman for the Port said that they plan to be open as usual.

”The International Longshore and Warehouse Union is proud to support the people working hard in Occupy Oakland and Occupy Wall Street

because too many of us are getting the shaft from corporate America,” said Craig Merrilees, spokesman for the longshoreman’s union.

City leaders said late last week that they didn’t yet know the cost of the police response to the protests. City Administrator Deanna Santana said the state will reimburse the city for the mutual aid cost of having other law enforcement agencies help Oakland police.

A spokeswoman for Quan wasn’t immediately available for comment today. Quan said on Friday that she didn’t yet want to crack down on protesters who are camping out in Frank Ogawa “if closing the camp would create more violence.”

She said “it’s a complex situation” and that city officials “have to make an assessment day to day.”

(Copyright 2011 by CBS San Francisco. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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