About The Bay: San Francisco Makes Plans To Feed Thousands In Case Of Disaster

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A man photographs the ruins of a building block in front of the remains of City Hall near Market and Seventh Streets after the Great Earthquake in San Francisco, California. The city hall which took 27 years to build at an estimated cost of $6 million, crumbled in less than 30 seconds during the quake. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

A man photographs the ruins of a building block in front of the remains of City Hall near Market and Seventh Streets after the Great Earthquake in San Francisco, California. The city hall which took 27 years to build at an estimated cost of $6 million, crumbled in less than 30 seconds during the quake. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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SAN FRANCISCO (KCBS) – San Francisco officials have been cooking up unique plans to feed the thousands of refugees they assume will need assistance in the days after a disaster strikes.

Earthquake preparedness is a timely topic in San Francisco, as the city prepares to mark the 107th anniversary of the great ’06 quake on April 18.

Geologists have long warned that it’s not a question of if but when the next big temblor will happen in the region. Predictions are that it could wreak just as much havoc as the 1906 earthquake, if not more.

The partnership has already been established between the San Francisco Department of Emergency Management and City College of San Francisco. Among the benefits: 400 students in City College’s culinary arms program will be taking classes on “mass meals,” so that they can be mobilized to emergency kitchens in the wake of an incident.

Informal training has already begun in the Salvation Army’s kitchens in the city’s South of Market. They have been making chicken and lentil soup, for instance – fine tuning a recipe that could serve upwards of 40,000 people at a time.

City officials have also been working to identify when and how emergency kitchens could become functional if power and water services were knocked out.

(Copyright 2013 by CBS San Francisco. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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