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Netflix Development Plan On Ballot For Santa Clara County Election

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LOS GATOS (CBS SF) — Measures on Tuesday’s ballot in certain parts of Santa Clara County are mostly about new taxes for schools or libraries, but voters in Los Gatos will mull a development plan by the online media company Netflix.

Measure A, meant only for voters in Los Gatos, has to do with a proposal by Netflix, called the Albright Specific Plan, to build up to 485,000 square feet of office and research and development space in four buildings on 21.6 acres off of Winchester Boulevard.

The Town Council approved a similar building plan in 2013, but the measure would repeal that approval and amend the city’s general plan to allow the project to move forward and any land uses changes can only happen by voter approval until 2021, when approval decisions revert back to the council, according to Town Attorney Robert Schultz.

Two of the four buildings would be no higher than 65 feet and the other two no taller than 50 feet and would be permitted to have pedestrian bridges connecting them, something the Town Council did not want, according to Schultz.

According to Supporters of Measure A, including Netflix Vice President Mike Kail and Silicon Valley Leadership Group president Carl Guardino, the development agreement provides $1 million annually to Los Gatos schools, $223,000 to the town of Los Gatos, $835,000 in other benefits and keeps Netflix based in Los Gatos.

A simple majority is needed to pass the measure.

Related: Race For Santa Clara County Sheriff

In San Jose, voters will consider passing Measure B, which would continue a parcel tax on property owners for another 25-year term to fund city libraries for books, computers, reading programs and teen, senior and literacy programs.

Measure B would have to be approved by two-thirds of city voters casting ballots on Tuesday in order to pass.

Voters living within the Milpitas Unified School District will decide on Measure C, renewing an $84 million parcel tax for another eight years to subsidize science, math, engineering, reading and writing classes, college preparation and teacher retention for elementary, middle and high school students in the district.

The measure also would require a two-thirds vote in the district to become effective.

Measure E before voters in the Los Gatos-Saratoga Joint Union High School District would issue $99 million in bonds used to pay for making repairs, upgrading school science labs, classrooms and technology, reducing overcrowding and acquiring new classroom sites and equipment.

The measure requires at least 55 percent approval.

Measure H before voters in the Evergreen School District in San

Jose would, if approved by a two-thirds vote, renew a $100 per parcel tax for another 5 years for science, math and technology instruction, keep class sizes low, improve teacher quality and training, protect arts, music programs and libraries and ensure school safety.

Voters within the Cambrian School District in west San Jose will mull Measure I, whether to issue $39 million in bonds to pay for projects meant to reduce classroom overcrowding, update fire and earthquake safety systems, provide newer technology for students, repair school buildings and install new heating cooling equipment.

To pass, 55 percent of people casting ballots in the district would have to vote yes.

In the Union School District in west San Jose, Measure J, needing at least a 55 percent positive vote to pass, would have the district issue $125 million in bonds for building repairs, updating classroom technology, teacher training, renovations, science labs and reducing overcrowding.

The Mount Pleasant School District in San Jose has Measure K, requiring a two-thirds vote to win, that would renew an expiring parcel tax that would take in $95 million over seven years for improving educational materials, libraries, technology and computer training, retaining music, art, qualified teachers and other things in the district’s elementary schools.

The Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District, which encompasses parts of Santa Clara and San Mateo counties, would need a two-third yes vote to pass Measure AA, the authorization to spend $300 million in bonds, at a tax rate of no more than $3.18 per $100,000 assessed valuation of property, to improve hiking and biking opportunities, protect and preserve redwood forests, coastline and wildlife habitat, protect water quality in creeks and reduce fire risk.

© Copyright 2014 by CBS San Francisco and Bay City News Service. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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