Porn Sites Block Californians To Protest Proposed Condom Law

SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — Kink.com is among the adult websites that are interrupting, or in some cases completely blocking, California internet users’ access to porn. They’re protesting a proposed California law that would require condoms to be worn during the making of adult films.

The move comes just weeks before the Nov. 8 election in which Californians will be voting on whether wearing condoms should be required during the production of pornography.

San Francisco-based Kink.com is sending a clear message to its viewers that they don’t support mandating condom use in adult films.

Proponents of Prop. 60, the Safer Sex in the Adult Film Industry Act, say the law would limit the spread of HIV and other sexually-transmitted infections in the adult film industry.

But opponents say Prop 60 would allow adult film producers and distributors to be sued if no condom is visible and could lose California millions in tax revenue.

The Los Angeles-based adult website Vivid Video had an all-black homepage Monday with a message that said, “If you live in California and Prop. 60 passes this is what your porn will look like.”

It also states, “Harassment is not a California value, No on 60” and provides links to the proposed legislation and arguments against the condom law.

The adult website Evil Angel, also based in Los Angeles, joined the protest saying, “We know you don’t want to see condoms in Evil Angel videos, so we’re doing what we can to prevent that from happening … EvilAngel.com is on strike today to raise awareness.”

In 2012, voters in Los Angeles County passed a measure that required adult film actors to wear condoms on set. If Prop. 60 passes in November, adult film performers across California would also be required to do so.

Spencer M. Barrick a Los Angeles resident, who goes by the stage name of Damon Dice told CBS San Francisco that he’s been in the adult industry for two years and that he has numerous concerns about Prop. 60.

Barrick said Prop. 60 allows him to be sued by any California resident “if they see I have shot a video and did not use a condom” he also says it could cost the the state tens of million in tax dollars.

The San Francisco AIDS Foundation is among the HIV-focused organizations that aren’t in support of Prop. 60.

According to the SF AIDS Foundation website, the legislation could open up performers to lawsuits and harassment.

“This process would expose real names, addresses, and other contact information of adult performers—which could be dangerous,” writes the SF AIDS Foundation.

In addition, the SF AIDS Foundation noted in their ballot guide, “some performers choose to protect themselves from HIV by using PrEP, a daily pill…Also, adult film production studios adhere to a rigorous HIV and STI testing schedule with a system called the Performer Screening Services…This helps ensure that performers complete HIV and STI testing every 14 days, have up-to-date test results on file, are linked to medical providers when treatment is needed, and that medical protocols are followed consistently.”

Barrick and other opponents of Prop. 60 say the ballot measure, written and funded by AIDS Healthcare Foundation president Michael Weinstein, isn’t forward-thinking enough for California.

By Hannah Albarazi – Follow her on Twitter: @hannahalbarazi.

Comments

One Comment

  1. Melissa says:

    These are professional and do a lot more to screen for disease than the average sexually active person. This reads like puritanism crossed with ambulance chasing.

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