Travel & Outdoors

AT&T Park Guide

September 13, 2010 12:40 PM

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(Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)

(Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)

att park exterior AT&T Park Guide

(Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

AT&T Park, with its breathtaking views and classic design, was chosen as the Sports Facility of the Year by Sports Business Journal and Sports Business Daily in 2008. The first privately financed ballpark in Major League Baseball since 1962, the San Francisco Giants’ home seats 42,000 fans and has many incredible features.

GETTING THERE

Public Transit

In San Francisco

Muni Metro Streetcar service to the Ballpark is available daily on the T-Third and via other Muni Metro streetcar lines on game days. Fans can transfer from any Metro line to streetcars serving the ballpark at Embarcadero Station – look for trains headed to Mission Bay, Caltrain or Sunnydale and get off at the 2nd Street/Ballpark Station. Muni buses 10, 30, 45 and 47 also stop within one block of the ballpark.

From the Peninsula and the South Bay

Take Caltrain from stations throughout Santa Clara and San Mateo counties directly to the ballpark – the Fourth and King Street Station is one block from the ballpark. Or take BART from Milbrae, SFO, South San Francisco, San Bruno, Colma or Daly City to downtown San Francisco. Then walk or transfer to Muni Metro to the ballpark (transfer from BART to MUNI Metro at Civic Center, Powell, Montgomery or Embarcadero).

From the East Bay

Take BART to Embarcadero or Montgomery Stations and walk or transfer to Muni Metro. The Alameda/Oakland Ferry Service provides direct service to the ballpark for most games and service to the Ferry Building at other times. AC Transit also provides bus service from many East Bay cities to the Transbay Terminal, a short walk to the ballpark.

From the North Bay

Take Golden Gate Transit’s Larkspur Ferry to the ballpark – direct service is available for all games except weekday day games.  For all Saturday and Sunday games, take the dedicated Vallejo Ferry directly to and from the ballpark. Return service from the ballpark is also provided for select weeknight games Monday-Friday. On weekday games, take a regularly scheduled Vallejo ferry to the Ferry Building and walk or take Muni Metro to the ballpark.

Driving

From the Peninsula/South Bay

Take 1-280 north (or I-101 north to I-280 north) to the Mariposa Street exit. Turn right on Mariposa Street, then left on Third Street to get to the parking lots.

From the East Bay

Take I-80/Bay Bridge to the Fifth Street exit. Exit onto Harrison Street. Exit onto Fifth St. Turn right onto Folsom and right onto Fourth St. Continue on Fourth St. to ballpark lots

From the North Bay

Take Highway 101 south/Golden Gate Bridge to the Marina Blvd. exit. Continue on Marina Blvd. past Fort Mason and turn left onto Bay Street. Continue on Bay and turn right onto the Embarcadero. Continue on the Embarcadero under the Bay Bridge until it turns into King Street. Turn left onto 3rd Street (the ballpark is on your left) and continue across the bridge to the parking lots.

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PARKING

AT&T Park has over 4,000 parking spaces in Parking Lots A, C, and D, as well as Pier 48. These lots are operated by Impark.  Cash/day of game parking is sold per vehicle on a first come/first served basis. Additional Parking is available north of the ballpark at Piers 30/32 (Embarcadero at Bryant) and also across the street from the Pier at Lot 26.

Street parking around the ballpark is limited; many spaces are restricted to 2-hour parking on game days.  Other private parking lots near the park can run from $15 to $20.

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PRE-GAMING

Tailgating is permitted in Parking Lots A, C and D for AT&T Park.  There are orange coal bins to dispose of hot coals and trash bins are located throughout the lots as well. For more information on parking and tailgating, please call Impark at (415) 227-0114.

Party spaces are also available in Lot D for large groups. Call the Giants Group Sales Office at (415) 972-2298 for more information or to book group tailgating spaces.  Ballpark parking lots open three hours before game time.

There are also a variety of well-known restaurants and bars inside and nearby AT&T Park for a pre-game meal or drink, including:

Public House, AT&T Park, 24 Willie Mays Plaza

MoMo’s, 760 2nd Street

Pete’s Tavern, 128 King Street

21st Amendment, 563 2nd Street

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att park interior AT&T Park Guide

(Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

TICKETS

Attendance is usually high for Giants games, but tickets can be easy to acquire. For individual regular-season games you can easily purchase tickets on the Giants ticketing website.

You should get your tickets early, though, because you’ll obviously have the largest variety of seating options and will probably pay less than if you wait. Buy tickets as soon as you know what dates you want to go.

Buying early gives you the best opportunity to get tickets directly from the Giants and avoid wading into the murky waters of the secondary ticket market. If you have no choice but to go this route, use every source you can to make sure you aren’t getting ripped off.

If you don’t mind – or are at least willing to – pay ‘service fees,’ check out Stubhub “the Official Fan to Fan Ticket Marketplace of giants.com.” The site is secure and you won’t have to haggle or deal with anyone face-to-face. All available tickets are presented in front of you and can be sorted by price or location.

If you put in some work, you can avoid fees and usually find deals a few days before the game on Craigslist. Ignore any posts that don’t list the price of the tickets and seem suspicious. And avoid paying above face value for unless it’s a premium game, or you absolutely have to.

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Seating

The stadium contains 68 luxury suites, 5,200 club seats on the club level and an additional 1,500 club seats at the field level behind home plate.

The Giants seating and pricing chart is a good place to start to find the best seats for the game.  The team uses dynamic ticket pricing, which means the prices can change depending on the opponent and the demand.

att park interior2 AT&T Park Guide

The view from bleacher Sections 141 & 142. (Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)

While most seats in the park offer great views of the field, the View Level seats in sections 302 and 304 offer spectacular views of the Bay Bridge, the East Bay and McCovey Cove.

While windy conditions at AT&T Park are nowhere near the kind that tormented Candletick Park fans, the center field bleacher seats in sections 141-144 are known for being among the most wind-blown in the ballpark.

If you’re stuck without seats for the game, consider taking in a few innings for free at the right field Portwalk, where you can also soak in sweeping views of the bay along the water’s edge.  Fans can view the game through the open arches free of charge for up to three innings or longer, depending on the size of the crowd.

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NO-NO’s

Everyone has to play by the rules – here are the ones specific to watching games at AT&T Park:

  •  No alcohol or illegal drugs may be brought into AT&T Park.
  •  No-Smoking policy at the ballpark.
  •  No using obscene or abusive language or engaging in any other anti-social or offensive conduct..
  •  No entering the playing field or throwing (or attempting to throw) objects, with the exception of home run balls, in the stands or onto the field.
  •  No air horns are allowed in the park.
  •  No large bags measuring over16″ x 16″ x 8″ are allowed into the ballpark.
  •  No hard-sided (soft-sided ok) coolers will be allowed inside.

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FOOD AND DRINK

Located throughout the ballpark are concession stands, bistros, and portable food carts featuring traditional ballpark fare and a wide variety of ethnic, gourmet, and specialty food concepts for guests of AT&T Park. The food and beverage offerings found at the ballpark were and continue to reflect the rich, local flavors and unique culinary offerings of the San Francisco Bay Area with new food items introduced each season. See a list of concessions at AT&T Park  Highlights include:

  • Gilroy Garlic Fries: The signature dish and smell of AT&T Park can be found at one of the park’s 10 garlic fries locations with a total of 73 purchase lines. The fries are made with fresh garlic and parsley, which are cut daily, and prepared in oil containing no trans fat.
  • Crazy Crab Sandwich: The Crazy Crab is made with Dungeness Crab and served on grilled, buttery sourdough bread and is available from the Centerfield Wharf located in the Scoreboard Plaza.
  • Orlando’s Cha-Cha Bowl: Created with our Hall-of-Famer Orlando Cepeda, this Puerto Rican inspired dish features black beans, seasoned rice and jerk chicken topped with a pineapple salsa. It can be found out in the Scoreboard Plaza on the Promenade Level and on the View Level.
  • Sheboygan Bratwurst: It would not be baseball without this ballpark favorite at AT&T Park. It is an authentic, Midwest-style bratwurst served directly from grill on a grilled sourdough roll topped with sauerkraut and onions. They are found on the Promenade in Sections 105 & 135 and on the View Level in Sections 307, 314 and 325 (on the Doggie Diner Grill carts).
  • Ferry Plaza Farmers Market/Strawberry Shortcake: This Club Level stand features local seasonal produce from the Ferry Plaza Farmers Market including a large bowl of fresh cut strawberries topped with freshly whipped cream.

The concession and food cart names at AT&T Park reflect the ethnic diversity of San Francisco. Fans will find some of the following stands and carts:

    • Murph’s Clubhouse Pub: This original ballpark brand, established in 2004 and named in honor of Giants Legendary Clubhouse Manager Mike Murphy, features the Pub’s signature Irish Nachos (Irish chili over crispy potatoes topped with cheddar and green onions), Fish and crispy Chips, Corned Beef Brisket, Roasted Turkey Breast, and Murph’s Chili Dog. The Pub also serves Black & Tans, Irish Coffee, and Hot Chocolate with Baileys Crème.
    • A Taste of North Beach: In keeping with the tradition of featuring local, San Francisco food offerings, this Promenade Kiosk features the traditional Stinking Rose Forty Clove Garlic Chicken Sandwich, Meatball Sandwich from U.S. Restaurant, tiramisu from Victoria Pastry and spicy Italian sausage topped with peppers and onions.
    • Ghirardelli Chocolate: One of San Francisco’s most recognized companies, especially for chocolate and ice cream lovers, features hot fudge sundaes, cokes and root beer floats. Located on the View and Club Levels and off the Promenade in O’Doul Plaza.
    • Giuseppe Bazurro’s: Giuseppe Bazurro was a San Francisco restaurateur whose restaurant was regarded as one of the best in the city during the Gold Rush heyday of the late 19th century. Our menu includes pizzas and “bazurros,” fresh flat bread, filled with luscious salads and lightly rolled.
    • Edsel Ford Fong’s: Named after Edsel Ford Fong, the San Francisco Chinatown waiter made (in)famous by his unique style of service. Choose from rice bowls, sushi, cold noodle salads, spiced nuts and fruit spears.
    • John J. McGraw Derby Grill: Hall of Fame Manager John J. McGraw inspired this American grill featuring premium hot dogs and sausages, burgers, fries, beer and peanuts.
    • Joe Garcia’s: This Pan-Latin concept is named for our own wildly enthusiastic Giants fan, Joe Garcia, who ran the elevators at the AT&T Park construction site from 1998-2000. Food offerings include authentic soft tacos, burritos and quesadillas.
    • Doggie Diner: The perfect place for just a good old Giants Dog, nachos, pretzels and peanuts. Named after the infamous Doggies Diners that were once popular diners in San Francisco, known for their gigantic Doggie head.
    • Say Hey Sausage Stand: A great selection of sausages named for the one and only “Say Hey Kid”…Mr. Willie Mays.
    • King Street Carvery: Features freshly carved turkey, beef brisket and pulled pork sandwiches.
    • California Wine Carts: Found on the Promenade and View Levels this unique carts feature many of California’s best wines. 

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AT THE STADIUM

att park mccovey cove AT&T Park Guide

McCovey Cove beyond the right field wall at AT&T Park. (Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)

Right field and McCovey Cove

The most prominent feature of the ballpark is the right field wall, which is 24 feet (7.3 m) high in honor of former Giant Willie Mays, who wore number 24. Because of the proximity to the San Francisco Bay, the right field foul pole is only 309 feet (94 m) from home plate. The wall is made of brick, with fenced off archways opening to the Cove beyond, above which are several rows of arcade seating. The fence angles quickly away from home plate; right-center field extends out to 421 feet (128 m) from home plate. Atop the fence are four pillars with fountains atop. These four pillars will burst jets of water when the Giants hit a home run, win a game, and at the end of the National Anthem.

Beyond right field is a section of the bay, dubbed McCovey Cove after famed Giants first baseman Willie McCovey, into which a number of home runs have been hit on the fly. Barry Bonds is the Giant who has hit the most home runs into “The Cove” as Giants fans call it.

att coke bottle glove AT&T Park Guide

(Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)

The Coke bottle and the Glove

Behind the left field bleachers is “The Coca-Cola Fan Lot”. The ballpark features an 80-foot (24 m) long Coca-Cola bottle with playground slides that will blow bubbles and light up with every Giants home run, and a miniature version of the stadium. “The Coca-Cola Superslide” is popular with children as is with adults, and the terraced levels of the slides is a fun way to catch the game.

If one were viewing the outfield promenade from home plate, directly to the bottle’s right is another oversized representation of a ballpark stalwart, the “Giant 1927 Old-Time Four-Fingered Baseball Glove” — this particular one is made of steel and fiberglass.

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Wireless internet

Starting in 2004, the Giants installed  wireless internet access points covering all concourses and seating areas, creating one of the largest public hotspots in the world.

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Statues

Outside the ballpark are five statues, four of which are dedicated to San Francisco Giants all-time greats. The Willie Mays Statue is located in front of the ballpark entrance at 24 Willie Mays Plaza and is surrounded with 24 palm trees, in honor of his number 24 uniform, retired by the Giants. It was dedicated at noon on March 31, 2000 prior to the opening of the ballpark and was commissioned by Giants Managing Partner Peter Magowan and his wife Debby.

Another statue is located at McCovey Point across McCovey Cove, and is dedicated to Willie McCovey.

A third statue, dedicated in 2005, honors former Giants pitcher Juan Marichal, and is located outside the ballpark at the Lefty O’Doul Gate entrance. The fourth statue is located at the park’s ferry plaza behind center field, also known as Seals Plaza; a statue of a seal bobbing a baseball on its nose honors the memory of the San Francisco Seals, the minor league baseball club that played before the arrival of the Giants in 1958.

On September 6, 2008, during a series against the Pittsburgh Pirates, a fifth statue depicting former Giants great Orlando Cepeda was dedicated at the corner of 2nd and King Streets next to the ballpark. All four statues of the Giants Hall of Fame players were created by sculptor William Behrends of North Carolina.

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Tours

Giants out of town and want to see the stadium? For $12.50 adult/$7.50 child you can take a behind-the-scenes tour. Tours last 1 hour, 30 minutes. The AT&T Park Tour will be given at 10:30 am and 12:30 pm. All tours depart from the Giants Dugout Store. More info call 415-972-2400.

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