Science

Image credit: Beao via wikimedia | http://bit.ly/1HmKkJz Rights information: http://bit.ly/cEcCkh

What Would Happen If You Dropped A Super Ball Off The Empire State Building?

The Super Ball is so ubiquitous even the Super Bowl was supposedly inspired by it, and now physics know exactly why and how it does its super things.

2 hours ago

Young Happy Man Sticking Out Tongue (Thinkstock)

Beer Tasting Electronic ‘Tongue’ Gives Computer Discerning Palette For Good Brews

Computerized “tongue” can taste differences in beer, with incredible accuracy, leading to better quality beer.

05/19/2015

The opah, also known as moonfish (Magnus Manske/Creative Commons)

Nature’s Surprise: First Ever Warm-Blooded Fish Discovered

As if this circular silver and orange fish wasn’t strange enough, researchers recently discovered it also has warm blood, giving it a unique advantage.

05/15/2015

Approximately 40 orcas were seen by a Sausalito whale watching expedition in March 2009, about 19 miles from the Golden Gate Bridge, inside the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. (Farallones National Marine Sanctuary)

100-Year-Old Killer Whale Grandmothers Guide Orca Pods To Food

Pacific killer whale females were more likely to lead the groups than males, and the older females were more likely to lead when fish were hard to find.

05/15/2015

Amtrak Derailment on May 13, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Getty Images / Anadolu Agency)

The Physics Of The Philadelphia Amtrak Derailment: What Happens When Steel Rails Do Battle With Steel Traveling At 106 MPH

Double the train’s speed and you quadruple the centripetal force on the rails.

05/14/2015

(Thinkstock)

Is Wine Vegan? Sure, Except For The Egg Whites, Gelatin, Milk Products And Fish Parts

(Inside Science Currents Blog) — Is your wine vegan? It seems like an odd question: wine is made of grapes, grapes fall solidly under the “not an animal product” label, therefore it would seem that wine is a vegan-friendly beverage.

05/13/2015

This image, drawn by George Cruikshank in 1828, satirizes the treatment of child offenders in early 19th century England. Image credit: http://bit.ly/1bGZPn7 Rights information: Public Domain

Stopping Kids From Re-Committing Crimes: A Lesson From Victorian England

(Inside Science) — From the mid-19th through early 20th centuries, children arrested for crimes in Victorian and Edwardian England were much less likely to wind up back in jail than youthful offenders are now, a team of English sociologists have reported. They credit, among other things, a penal system that provided young offenders with job training.

05/13/2015

(WALTRAUD GRUBITZSCH/AFP/Getty Images)

Prospect Of DNA-Edited Designer Babies Has UC Scientists Rethinking Their Own Discovery

When scientists at the University of California, Berkeley came up with a way to edit DNA, the genetic blueprint of all living things, they had no idea one day they might regret it.

05/11/2015

Da Vinci surgical robot demonstrates dexterity by peeling a grape. (Photo from da Vinci)

Could Robotic Grape Surgery Be The Tipping Point For Robo Buses, Robo Security Guards, Even Robo News Articles?

At some point, it’s inevitable that machines will become better than humans at certain tasks. For surgeons, that day may be here soon but what about city buses, security cameras, and even journalists writing articles like this one?

05/11/2015

Astronauts watch the Star Wars prequel in space. (NASA)

ISS Astronauts Watch Star Wars To Celebrate Jedi Holiday

In a meta moment science nerds can only dream of, astronauts at the International Space Station watched Stars Wars Monday to celebrate May The Fourth.

05/05/2015

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