SACRAMENTO (CBS/AP) — As part of his revised budget, Gov.  Jerry Brown will propose eliminating a state board that has been criticized for providing a highly-paid landing spot for termed-out lawmakers looking for work.

Brown will propose eliminating the California Unemployment Insurance Appeals Board as part of his revised budget plan to help close the state’s $15.4 billion deficit. The Democratic governor will release the full plan Monday.

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Administration spokesman Gil Duran said the move will save $1.2 million a year, but it’s also symbolic.

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Six of the board’s seven members are former lawmakers. They each make $128,109 a year even though the board meets once—and occasionally twice—a month.

The board has been criticized for backlogs and decisions that some said were delayed deliberately.

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