MILPITAS (CBS SF) – Some former Bay Area college students are trying to figure out what to do next after learning this weekend that there would be no class anytime soon at Heald College, WyoTech or other educational institutions run by Corinthians College.

Corinthians, the for-profit parent company of Heald, has confirmed that it has shut down all all instruction at 28 campuses.

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Students got the bombshell email announcing the closure Sunday morning that the school was closing. Corinthians executives said they had been in talks to sell the 150-year-old Heald franchise, but blamed federal and state regulations for the collapse of those deals and asserting that the organization had “attempted to do everything within our power to provide a quality education and an opportunity for a better future.”

Bay Area students who spoke to KPIX 5 Monday did not agree with that assessment.

“It feels like they didn’t care,” said student Jessica Arambula “It seemed like all they wanted was for us to come in, take our money, and get rid of us.”

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By Monday morning, the windows of the Milpitas campus of Heald College were covered with messages of betrayal for the way Heald, best known for training business and legal administrative professionals.

A message left on the Heald College campus window in Milpitas. (CBS)

A message left on the Heald College campus window in Milpitas. (CBS)

“Our money was more important than our education,” read another.

A message left on the window of Heald College in Milpitas. (CBS)

A message left on the window of Heald College in Milpitas. (CBS)

The closure comes less than two weeks after the U.S. Department of Education announced it was fining the for-profit institution $30 million for misrepresentation for inflating job placement numbers. The announcement displaces about 16,000 students around the country.

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The Santa Ana-based company said it was working with other schools to help students continue their education.