SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — A man accused in a highly-publicized assault outside a San Francisco condo earlier this month will stay in jail although he won’t be charged in a second alleged attack, following an eventful court hearing Thursday morning.

At the end of the proceeding – held only after three other courts passed on holding the hearing – Austin Vincent was heard swearing at prosecutors after Judge Ross C. Moody ordered him held without bail for the August 11 attack on a woman entering The Watermark condominium complex.

Moody dropped charges in which another woman accused him in a February assault after his defense attorney presented evidence Vincent was in Southern California at the time.

Thursday, Moody said the “totality of circumstances” did not provide clear and convincing evidence that releasing Vincent with a GPS tracker would be adequate to ensure his return to court.

Vincent had what might be described as an outburst on the way out of the courtroom, muttering some things in objection to the judge’s decision as well as some words that may have been directed at the prosecutor. There was a loud bang when he disappeared into the hallway after the court appearance ended.

Following his arrest for the Watermark building assault which was captured on surveillance video, a judge ordered Vincent released from jail, prompting a public outcry that included criticism from San Francisco Mayor London Breed and the San Francisco Police Officers Association.

Vincent was also undergoing mental health treatment after being released. Last week, City Attorney Dennis Herrera defended Judge Christine Van Aken’s actions to release Vincent, noting that the District Attorney’s Office had video of the attack at the time of Vincent’s initial arraignment and did not provide it to Van Aken. who ordered Vincent to wear an ankle monitor after seeing the video.

Thursday’s hearing also included a playing of The Watermark attack video and the reading of a statement from the victim, San Francisco resident Paneez Kosarian.

The 25-year-old Vincent was being held for criminal threat and assault charges he received for the alleged February incident after Van Aken ordered him
into custody in connection with those charges, which have now been dropped.

Vincent’s public defender has argued he should be placed back with assertive case management, saying Vincent had been in full compliance and receiving housing and counseling.

The attack captured on surveillance video and subsequent publicity ignited a debate over homelessness and crime within San Francisco, particularly when the judge ordered Vincent released from jail.

Because The Watermark building is located next to the future site of the city’s SAFE Navigation Center, set to provide beds for as many 200 homeless residents, opponents of the center are using the case to renew their plea to stop it from opening.

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