SAN RAMON (KPIX) – School is out for summer but parents are already wondering what will happen to students in the Fall during the pandemic. One district facing a budget shortfall is already asking parents for money, and parents have concerns over how it will be spent.

In a letter to the San Ramon Valley Unified School District, parents said they want to end what they call ‘financial insanity.’ That includes giving raises to administrators while the future of their children’s education is in limbo.

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On Tuesday night, parents, students and even teachers gathered outside the district office, to make sure their voices were heard.

“It’s the little things that have added up now to a full blown frustration,” said parent Lorraine Bordegaray.

That includes things like raises for top administrators and buying new trucks and software for field trips even though parents say their kids most likely will not go on field trips in the upcoming school year.

This comes as the district is asking parents at San Ramon High to donate nearly $600 dollar per student to make up for a budget shortfall.

“If we’re being threatened with our kids only going to school 2 days a week, then I’m not exactly sure what we’re paying for,” asks parent Jen French.

The district is still deciding what to do next Fall.

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Kristin Lineberry teaches middle school math. She says distance learning didn’t work.

“As hard as I tried and everything I offered, I just knew they were not getting the education they deserved,” said Linberry.

According to data released during the board meeting, roughly 46 percent of families are in favor of having in-person school.

Student Anna Lineberry, who will be going into her senior year says she didn’t have a single zoom class in the Spring.

“Wrap me in bubble wrap, I don’t care. I just want to go back to school,” she said.

Superintendent Rick Schmitt says the district is still dealing with a lot of unknowns with COVID-19 and it’s too soon to make a decision about the fall.

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The district is facing an $8 million deficit, regardless of whether or not the state makes cuts to education.