By Betty Yu

SAN JOSE (KPIX) — Parts of the Bay Area have been in and out of red flag warnings all month but this Sunday’s wind event is going to bring winds that we have not seen this year.

The landscape is dry, the winds will be high and the humidity low.

PG&E announced Friday a wide-ranging public safety power shutoff warning that could affect the entire Bay Area — except for San Francisco.

“Two dogs, three children, four go-bags, passports ready. We’re just ready — water, food — it’s ready at all times, it’s in our garage,” said Maurice Carrubba, owner of the Mount Hamilton GrandView Restaurant.

RELATED: PG&E Plans Sunday Power Shutoffs for 1 Million California Residents

Carrubba’s steak house overlooks the Santa Clara Valley. It’s an area that may not typically experience red flag conditions. He is prepared to move guests indoors and close part of the outdoor dining patio.

“We have our generators, we have a plan for our animals as well, as we do have a 50-acre farm across the street. We have our own water so we’re kind of off the grid here,” Carrubba said.

Cal Fire says it is bringing more firefighters on duty and adding more equipment, including aircraft earlier in the day to respond to emergencies.

“Residents even miles from wild land areas really need to be on high alert this weekend because embers can travel often times a mile past the fire and those embers rain down, igniting homes,” said Daniel Berlant, assistant deputy director of Cal Fire.

In addition to getting documents together, Cal Fire says residents should have alternative evacuation routes in case trees or power poles fall onto the road.

“Garages to today’s standards have easy access even when the power’s out but, for those who may not be able to lift the garage door, park your car outside, have it backed up for easy escape,” added Berlant.

Campbell resident Jose Duarte is thinking about his family’s plan.

“You know we have electric vehicles and do we charge them up the night before? Or maybe we’re going to Uber the next few days,” Duarte said.

The strongest winds are expected to occur in the overnight hours so many people may be asleep, which is why Cal Fire is stressing the importance of being prepared.

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