SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — Volunteers installed the 26th annual Pink Triangle on Twin Peaks in San Francisco on Saturday afternoon in preparation for the start of Pride Month on Tuesday.

The triangle, which organizers with Pink Triangle of Twin Peaks say covers about an acre on the hillside, will be illuminated nightly for a month starting Tuesday, using 2,700 pink LED nodes from Illuminate, the nonprofit organization behind the light display on the Bay Bridge.

Pink Triangle - San Francisco Pride

Fog rolls in above the 26th Pink triangle, installed on Twin Peaks in San Francisco on May 29, 2021. The triangle will be illuminated nightly in June by 2,600 LED nodes for Pride Month. (Courtesy of Patrick Carney)

Two days of test lighting on Saturday and Sunday will lead up to the official illumination ceremony set for about 9 p.m. Tuesday, with San Francisco Mayor London Breed and other dignitaries, for the first day of Pride Month.

Before the lighting ceremony, a Pink Torch Procession will set out from Oakland City Hall, with Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf and others crossing the Bay Bridge with a pink torch that will then be delivered to Mayor Breed at Twin Peaks by Dykes on Bikes for the official illumination.

Volunteers install the 26th annual Pink Triangle on Twin Peaks in San Francisco on May 29, 2021. The triangle will be illuminated nightly in June for Pride Month. (Courtesy of Patrick Carney)

The installation of the triangle is a community-building event “which brings together LGBTQs with families from across the Bay Area who turn out to volunteer to install the giant display and learn about LGBTQs person-to-person,” organizers said in a news release. “Many families bring children to meet us as individuals and to learn the ‘History of the Pink Triangle’ during the ceremony.”

Organizers said the triangle itself is a reminder and a warning of what can happen when groups are singled out as they were in Nazi Germany, which used the symbol to brand homosexuals as undesirable, just as triangles of other colors were used to distinguish other segments of the population not deemed wanted.

“It is the same kind of senseless, irrational hatred that still haunts gays, Jews, Blacks, Asians, transgender persons and other minorities today,” organizers said.

Volunteers will return on July 1 to take down the triangle.

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