SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — Giants star Buster Posey’s retirement announcement Thursday dropped the curtain on one of San Francisco’s greatest sports eras.

During his 12-year Major League career, he helped lead the Giants to World Series titles in 2010, 2012 and 2014. He was the 2010 NL Rookie of the Year and the 2012 NL MVP, while also earning four Silver Slugger Awards, one Gold Glove Award behind the plate, and one NL batting title.

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Here are five of the most memorable moments in his illustrious career.

June 13, 2012 — Matt Cain Tosses A Perfect Game

If you ask a catcher what is the greatest moment during his career, invariably he won’t talk about towering home runs. It’s the mastery of the game from behind the plate and calling a perfect game is the ultimate. For Posey that perfect moment in time came on June 13 against the Houston Astros. Fittingly, the man on the mound that night was Matt Cain. Posey recognized early that Cain’s fastball was lively. He repeatedly asked for it up in the zone. The final out was made by Astros pinch-hitter Jason Castro, who chopped a 1-2 pitch to third base where it was fielded and he was tossed out, setting off a wild celebration. Posey told reporters feeling he was “as nervous as I’ve ever been on a baseball field.”

September 11, 2009 — Posey Called Up To The Major Leagues

After quickly rising through the minor leagues after being drafted in 2008, Posey got the call every player young player dreams of. Giants starting catcher Bengie Molina had been injured. It was time to pack his bags in Fresno and head to the Big Leagues. He stepped right into the heated Giants-Los Angeles Dodgers rivalry. In his first at bat against Hiroki Kuroda, he struck out. He’d have to wait eight more days before picking up his first major league hit on against Dodger pitcher Jeff Weaver. In 17 at-bats with the Giants in 2009, Posey had two hits but he had grabbed the organization’s attention. He was called up again on May 29, 2010, going three for four with three RBIs and never looked back.

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Oct. 31, 2010 — Posey Goes Deep In Game 4 Of World Series

Posey and Madison Bumgarner teamed up in Game 4 against the Texas Rangers to become the first rookie starting pitcher-catcher tandem in a World Series since Yogi Berra caught Spec Shea in 1947. He ripped his first postseason home run in the 4–0 victory, making him the fifth rookie catcher to hit a home run in the World Series. The Giants went on to cliched the World Series crown with a Game 5 victory. Posey batted .300 with a home run and two RBI and caught every inning of the playoffs for the Giants.

October 11, 2012 — Posey Grand Slam lifts Giants To NL Divisional Series Win Over Cincinnati

The Giants dug themselves into a deep hole, losing the first two games to the heavily favored Reds at San Francisco’s AT&T Park. To advance they would have to pull off a three-game sweep in Cincinnati setting up Posey’s Game 5 heroics. Posey hit a grand slam off of Reds starter Mat Latos, giving the Giants an insurmountable 6–0 lead. He then teamed up with Sergio Romo to end a ninth-inning threat, capping a 6-4 victory. The Giants become the second NL team to win a Division Series after being down two games to none. Posey became just the third catcher in MLB history to hit a grand slam in the playoffs, along with Berra and Eddie Pérez.

May 25, 2011 — A Fateful Collision At The Plate

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During a May 25th game against the Florida Marlins, Posey suffered the most devastating injury of his career. It was in the 12th inning when Scott Cousins barreled into Posey at home plate, scoring the eventual winning run on a sac fly. Posey suffered a fractured fibula and torn ligaments in his ankle, requiring season-ending surgery. The collision led Major League Baseball to adopt rule 7.13 — informally known as the Buster Posey Rule — which states that “a runner attempting to score may not deviate from his direct pathway to the plate in order to initiate contact with the catcher (or other player covering home plate).”