Steve Jobs Offered Rare Insights During ’60 Minutes’ Interview

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Apple CEO Steve Jobs delivers the keynote address at Macworld January 7, 2003 in San Francisco. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Apple CEO Steve Jobs delivers the keynote address at Macworld January 7, 2003 in San Francisco. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

CUPERTINO (CBS News) — In a rare 2003 “60 Minutes” interview with CBS News, Apple Inc. co-founder Steve Jobs – who transformed the worlds of personal computing, music and mobile phones – offered some insights into his business philosphy and personal motivation.

Jobs died Wednesday at the age of 56, after a long battle with pancreatic cancer.

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In the interview, Jobs explained why he modeled his business at Apple after the Beatles by pointing out that “great things in business are never done by one person, they are done by a team of people.”

“The model of business is the Beatles,” he offered. “They were four very talented guys who kept each others negative tendencies in check. They balanced each other and the total was greater than the sum of the parts. And that is how I see business.”

Jobs continued, “The Beatles, when they were together, did truly brilliant innovative work. When they split up, they did good work but it was never the same. And I see business that way too, it is always a team.”

In addition, Jobs talked with “60 Minutes” about leaving Apple at the age of 30 and offered insight into what he considered to be his biggest strength and weakness.

“I have been very luck in meeting incredibly talented people. And hanging out with them, so that has been my greatest strength. You know all of us need to be on guard against arrogance, which knocks at the door whenever you are successful,” he explained.

“I was basically fired from Apple when I was thirty, and was invited to come back twelve years later,” he continued. “That was difficult when it happened, but maybe the best thing that ever happened to me. There would not be a Pixar if that did not happen. And so, you move on, life go on and you learn from it.”

Jobs added, “I thought at that moment, what a circle of life. Life is always mysterious and surprising and you never know what is around the next corner.”

In the 2003 interview, Jobs also talked about how collaborating on products that have the ability to influence people’s experiences and the world was what motivated him.

“I like working with people, where you have a chance to influence where things go. I am very luck I get to do that at Apple,” he noted. “I still believe the computer business is still in infancy, and I am optimistic on the future of the business.”

(Copyright 2011 CBS San Francisco. All rights reserved.)

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